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Newton, Massachusetts 02159 Academic Catalog 1970 



Newton College of the Sacred Heart 



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Table of Contents 

The Curriculum / 2 
Courses of Instruction / 6 
Fees and Expenses / 38 
Registry / 40 
Calendar / IBC 



1 




The College reserves the right to make changes in the regulations and courses announced in this catalog. 



Newton, Massachusetts 02159 



Academic Catalog 1970 

Newton College of the Sacred Heart 
Library 

885 Centre Street 
Newton. Massachusetts 02159 



Newton College of the Sacred Heart 





The Curriculum 



The requirements for the Bachelor of Arts or the Bachelor 
of Science degree have been so arranged as to leave the 
fullest freedom of choice to the student w^hile still ensuring a 
broad acquaintance with the main field of scholarly interest. 
Work in the major field is intended to lay a firm foundation 
in one discipline, or, in the case of the Liberal Studies major, 
to assist the student to achieve a synthesis of her knowledge 
as she draws it from a number of different disciplines and 
applies it to her chosen problem. 

Along with freedom to choose among different courses and 
disciplines, the student is also exposed to a variety of educa- 
tional situations as part of her learning. Instruction occurs 
not only through lectures, but also field work, tutorials, in- 
dependent research, cinema, foreign study, and cross-registra- 
tion at other Boston-area institutions. 

Each student is personally responsible for knowing the 
academic policies and fulfilling the academic requirements 
that apply to her that are stated in the official catalog of 
Newton College of the Sacred Heart. 



Requirements for the Degree of Bacftelor of Arts 

Most students take four semesters of The Study of World 
Cultures as the basis of their liberal arts program. The course 
provides an opportunity to single out for attention the great 
problems which have faced Western man. By way of compari- 
son, other cultures are drawn upon to illuminate the manner 
in which mankind has grappled with its questions — political, 
social, economic, philosophical, artistic and religious. Prac- 
tically all members of the Newton College faculty lecture in 
the course and eminent scholars from other colleges and 
universities (i.e. Boston College, Brandeis, Harvard, Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology) also contribute to the variety 
and richness of the intellectual experience. A list of readings 
centering largely on the great masterpieces of the world gives 
depth to the treatment of the material. The course, which is 
a "study," not a "survey," is interdisciplinary in nature and 
selective in its coverage. It seeks to bring about an "illum- 
ination of the mind" rather than the mere retention of a mass 
of facts. Students who have completed the course are usually 
enthusiastic about its value to them. Yet there will always be 
students who find a pre-established series of lectures and 
readings not sufficiently suited to their own needs. Such stu- 
dents may present an alternate program accounting for about 
the same amount of credit and fulfilling some the same objec- 
tives as are sought in The Study of World Cultures. If their 
program meets with the approval of the Academic Dean they 
may proceed with it. Such a plan may be substituted for the 
whole or for a part of The Study of World Cultures. 

Entering students are required to demonstrate during the 
freshman year proficiency in English Composition. In addition, 
all freshmen who do not have a medical exemption are re- 
quired to complete two semesters of Physical Education. 

Each student will elect a major field in which she must meet 
the requirements established by the department. In all other 
aspects the student is free to choose her own courses. 

The Degree of Bacfielor of Science 

Newton College also offers the Bachelor of Science degree. 
The requirements are the same as those for the Bachelor of 
Arts degree with a heavier specialization in the sciences. 



The Major 

The major fields of study offered at Newton College of the 
Sacred Heart are the following: 

American Studies Liberal Studies 

Art Mathematics 

Art History Modern Languages 

Biology Philosophy 

Chemistry Physics 

Classics Political Science 

Comparative Literature Pre-dental Studies 

Economics Pre-medical Studies 

English Psychology 

French Religion 

German Sociology 

History Spanish 

All major fields look to preparation for graduate study but 
they also offer the student who will not pursue the subject 
matter at a higher level the possibility of gaining skills and 
insights and, at least in some measure, the particular qualities 
of mind which that discipline especially imparts. 

Interdisciplinary Majors 

Several of the above mentioned major fields of study are 
interdisciplinary by nature. American Studies affords the stu- 
dent the possibility of concentrating her attention on the polit- 
ical, social and cultural history of the United States as she 
takes courses dealing with American art, government, phil- 
osophy, literature, music, economic structure, as well as his- 
tory. Classics combines the study of the Latin and Greek 
languages and literature with that of classical history and art. 
Comparative Literature integrates the knowledge of more than 
one literature. The major in Modern Languages allows the 
student to study in depth two of the five modern tongues 
taught at Newton College — French, German, Italian, Russian 
and Spanish. A major in Pre-medical Studies usually involves 
work in biology, chemistry, physics and mathematics while 
leaving enough flexibility to allow the student to meet the 
sometimes differing requirements of several medical schools. 
The Liberal Studies major allows each selected student to 
develop her own curriculum under the guidance of one or 
more faculty members. 

Non-Major Fields 

There are also two fields of study — education and music — 



which, though not constituting a major field, offer a sequence 
of courses amounting to some thirty semester hours and are 
open to students of all majors. 

1. THE EDUCATION PROGRAM 

The Education Program meets the certification requirements 
of Massachusetts, and of most other states because of the 
reciprocity arrangements among the states of the United 
States. The purpose of the innovative program is to bring as 
much and as varied field experience in community education 
settings as possible within the range of the students. Seminars 
guided by practitioners in different aspects of elementary and 
secondary school teaching will assist students to relate their 
experiences to the body of theory built up by professional 
educationists. Flexibility in structure and responsiveness in 
planning each student's curriculum characterize the program 
which is available to all students to complement their major 
field. The divisions of science and modern languages have 
established special programs in collaboration with the faculty 
of the Education department to prepare students for teaching 
in those fields. 

2. THE MUSIC PROGRAM 

The music courses offered at Newton College of the Sacred 
Heart are intended to form an important part of the liberal 
arts curriculum and they make use of the remarkable musical 
facilities of the Boston area. 

Academic Policies 

Each candidate for the Bachelor of Arts or the Bachelor of 
Science degree must have one hundred twenty-eight credits 
while maintaining a passing cumulative grade point average 
(2.0). The normal period of time in which to earn the degree is 
four years and a normal program of study consists of sixteen 
semester hour credits a semester. The student must fulfill 
the requirements of a major field and must spend her fourth 
year in academic residence. Either the second or third year 
may be spent studying abroad. 

CHANGE OF SCHEDULE; 

Drop — At the beginning of each semester there is a three- 
week period in which students may withdraw from courses 
without penalty. After this period it is necessary to secure 
the approval of both the faculty member teaching the course 
and the Office of the Academic Dean. A notation of AW 
(Approved Withdrawal) will appear on the transcript of a stu- 
dent who has dropped a course. No indication of a grade in 



the dropped course will be given. If a student fails to notify 
the Registrar's office that she has officially withdrawn from 
any course for which she has officially registered, a grade 
of no credit will be entered on her permanent record for this 
course. 

Add — At the beginning of each semester there is a three- 
week period in which students may add courses to their 
schedule. After this period, approval must be obtained from 
the faculty member teaching the course and from the Office of 
the Academic Dean. 

Fee — There is a $10 fee for dropping or adding a course 
after the three-week period. 

CREDIT FOR OTHER ACADEMIC WORK 
Thirty-two credits is the maximum to be accepted by Newton 
College for a year of study abroad or at another college in 
the United States. 

Summer study, either in the United States or abroad, is 
allowed and sometimes advised. Courses taken in summer 
school may count as upper-division courses in a major field 
if the student receives the approval of the department head 
and the Office of the Academic Dean. Courses not in the stu- 
dent's major field only need the approval of the Office of the 
Academic Dean. Credit will be transferred fron) any accredited 
college or university for a course in which the student has 
received a grade of C or above subject to the policy stated 
above. No more than nine credits altogether may be trans- 
ferred from summer sessions, regardless of how many ses- 
sions the student attends. 

CROSS-REGISTRATION 

Cross-registration is arranged with colleges in the vicinity 
during the Fall and Spring semesters. Credit will be trans- 
ferred only with the approval of the Office of the Academic 
Dean. 

GRADING SYSTEM 

The grading system beginning with the academic year 1970- 

71 Is as follows: 



Letter Grade 


Grade Points 


Quality Points 


A 


4.0 


Grade points 


B+ 


3.5 


times 


B 


3.0 


the 


C 


2.0 


number of 


D 


1.0 


semester hours 


No credit 








3.5 



3.7 



3.9 



Honor List 



High Honors 



The semester average is found by dividing the sum of the 
quality points by the number of semester hours taken. The 
cumulative average is the average of the semester grade point 
averages to date. The passing cumulative average and the 
passing semester average are both 2.0. 

Once a final grade is reported to the Office of the Registrar, 
it cannot be changed without the approval of the Academic 
Dean. Requests for such changes must be in writing by the 
faculty member to the Dean, giving full reasons for the re- 
quested change. 

HONORS: 

(Computed on each (Computed on 
semester's work the cumulative 
taken alone) average) 

Dean's List Cum Laude at 

Graduation 
Magna Cum Laude 
at Graduation 
Summa Cum Laude 
at Graduation 
A portfolio of recommendations and evaluations of each 
student majoring in a field will be kept in the department and 
will be used in interpreting the student's record. 

INCOMPLETE GRADES: 

The grade "Incomplete" can only be given with the written 
approval of the instructor and of the Office of the Academic 
Dean. Such approval must be gained before the beginning of 
the examination period and will be given only in the cases 
of illness or real emergency. All take-home examinations and 
final papers must be given to professors on or before the date 
specified for the final examination. Approved "Incompletes" 
will include the date by which the work will be completed. 

INDEPENDENT STUDY AND READING COURSES 
Many departments of the College offer a program which pro- 
vides the possibility of students taking a course of individual 
study directed by a member of the faculty. Under this pro- 
gram an eligible student may undertake a research project 
or a program of reading in a particular field. The results of 
this work normally will be presented in a final report or exam- 
ination. To be eligible for credit in such a course a student 
must present in advance to the Office of the Academic Dean 
a written description of the course, the number of credits 
desired, and the name and signature of approval of her in- 
structor. Only after she has received the approval of the 



Dean's Office may she undertake such a course. Approval is 
not given for a reading or independent study course in a 
subject matter handled in regular courses. 

PASS/FAIL COURSES 

Students in the sophomore, junior and senior classes may 
take courses on a Pass/Fail basis up to the number of six 
courses for the three years. This option does not apply to 
The Study of World Cultures or to courses to be used for 
upper-division credit in the major field. The decision to take 
a course Pass/Fail rather than for a letter grade must be 
made at the time of registration or during the three-week 
period for adjusting registration given at the beginning of each 
semester. 

READMISSION 

Any student who has withdrawn from Newton College of the 
Sacred Heart in good standing may be readmitted under the 
conditions that apply to transfer students. 

REGISTRATION 

Students should register on the registration dates announced 
in the College calendar. Permission of the Registrar must be 
secured for registration on dates other than those assigned. 
No credit will be given for any course for which the student 
is not duly registered and which is not officially scheduled. 

STUDENT COURSE LOAD 

Students are ordinarly not allowed to take more than sixteen 
semester hour credits per semester. Permission to take addi- 
tional credit must be obtained from the Office of the Academic 
Dean and a fee of $50 for each credit above the maximum 
will be charged. This additional tuition fee does not apply to 
classes graduating in 1971-1972. 

{Note: Students taking The Study of World Cultures are 
allowed to take seventeen credits without being obligated to 
pay for the extra credit.) 

STUDY ABROAD 

Programs which include a year of study abroad are an Im- 
portant part of the curriculum at Newton College of the 
Sacred Heart. A student with a cumulative average of 3.0 who 
wishes to take a year abroad should discuss her plans well 
in advance with the Office of the Academic Dean and with 
one or more professors In her major field. Approval will be 
contingent on the possibility of her completing the work 
successfully. 



WITHDRAWALS 

A student who wishes to withdraw from the College must 
make application to the Academic Dean and Registrar for 
permission to withdraw in good standing. A student who Is on 
academic or disciplinary probation is not considered to be 
in good standing. 

Any student whose cumulative average falls below 2.0 is 
subject to being asked to withdraw from the College. The 
College may request withdrawal of any student whose be- 
havior is not in accord with the standard required by the 
College. All withdrawals must be made officially through the 
Offices of the Academic Dean, the Dean of Students, the 
Business Manager and the Registrar. 

The LaFosse Program 

The Religious of Christian Education maintain the LaFosse 
Training Program which Is affiliated with Newton College of 
the Sacred Heart. The professors who teach in the program 
are members of the Newton College of the Sacred Heart 
Faculty. The courses are approved and the credit for them 
Is given by Newton College. 

The Mount Alvernia College Program 

This Missionary Franciscan Sisters of the Immaculate Con- 
ception have arranged that some of the courses given in 
Mount Alvernia College are to be under the supervision of 
Newton College of the Sacred Heart which assumes respon- 
sibility for the choice of faculty members, the syllabus for 
these courses, and the giving of credit for them. 



Courses of Instruction 



Courses with a double number extend through two semesters. 
Odd-numbered courses are given in the first semester; even- 
numbered courses in the second. The number in parentheses 
after the title of the course indicates the number of semester 
hours of credit. Courses are offered only if a sufficient number 
enroll for them. 

American Studies Program 

COURSE OF STUDY: 

The student in American Studies must have a grade of C or 
better in twelve semester courses, including AM 401-402 and 
His 203-204 or His 205-206. With the approval of her adviser 
or the coordinator of American Studies, the student may 
choose appropriate courses offered by other departments in 
the college. A senior project shall be completed in an area 
of the student's choice. Students contemplating graduate 
school or a specialized profession are reminded of the ad- 
visability of planning their courses with this in mind. This 
should involve an indication, at the earliest time, of some 
special field of interest and should include appropriate allied 
courses which would aid the student in her chosen field(s) 



of concentration. All majors should submit their proposed 
schedule of courses to their adviser and the coordinator of 
American Studies prior to semester registration. 

COURSE OFFERINGS: 

Most students enroll in appropriate courses offered by the 

History, Political Science, Art, English, Sociology, Philosophy, 

Religion and Economics departments. In addition there are 

some specially designed courses for American Studies which 

include: 

Am 401-402 American Studies Seminar (3, 3) 
An examination in depth of certain significant developments 
of the American experience with an emphasis on the modern 
period. Open only to seniors majoring in American Studies or 
American History. 

Am 497-498 Independent Study in American Studies (0-3, 

0-3) 
The student who wishes to take one or two semesters of 
Independent Study will present a typewritten detailed descrip- 
tion of the course requirements as agreed to by the professor 
giving the course and as approved by a representative of the 
Dean's office. 

The student must successfully carry through the project 
as outlined. It is only if these conditions are satisfied that 
Independent Study will carry academic credit. 

Only one Independent Study course should be carried in 
any one semester. 

Art 

ART HISTORY 

REQUIREMENTS FOR HISTORY OF ART MAJORS: 
2 semesters in either AS 101-102 or AS 241-242; 2 semesters 
Art 101-102; 10 upper division courses in the art department, 
of which at least 8 must be in Art History, completed with a 
grade of C or better and a satisfactory senior project. Stu- 
dents are recommended to have a sufficient language facility 
to be able to do serious research. German, French, or Italian 
is recommended. 

Art 101 History of Art (3) 
Prehistoric through Medieval; survey with readings in art 
history. 

Art 102 History of Art (3) 
Renaissance through Modern; survey with readings in art 
history. Taught alternate years; open to all art majors, all 
juniors and seniors, and others with permission. 



Art 301 Prehistoric Art (2) 

A study of the art and culture of Europe and the Near East 
from the Palaeolithic through the Neolithic. 

Offered 1971-1972. 

Art 301 W Workshop for Prehistoric Art (1) 
Problems in aesthetics and techniques related to the study 
of prehistoric art. Required for those taking ART 301. 

Offered 1971-1972. 

Art 310 Japanese Art and Architecture (3) 
Survey of Japanese art including minor decorative arts. 

Art 316 Greek Art (2) 
A study of Greek art within the context of the development 
of cult centers and planning. 

Offered 1971-1972. 

Art 316W Workshop for Greek Art (1) 
Problems in aesthetics and techniques related to the study of 
Greek art. Required for those taking ART 316. 

Offered 1971-1972. 

Art 321 Medieval Architecture (3) 
Offered 1971-1972. 

Art 322 Medieval Painting, Sculpture and Decorative Art 

(3) 
Offered 1971-1972. 

Art 331-332 Italian Renaissance Art (3, 3) 

Italian art of the fourteenth, fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. 

Offered 1971-1972. 

Art 336 Renaissance in Northern Europe (3) 
Painting in Northern Europe from Late Gothic illuminating to 
the work of Pieter Bruegel the Elder. 

Art 340 Italian Renaissance and Baroque Architecture 

(3) 
Offered 1972-1973. 

Art 341 Roman Baroque (3) 

A study of the development of baroque forms in art and 
architecture in and around Rome from the mid-sixteenth 
through the mid-seventeenth centuries. 

Art 342 Baroque Outside of Italy (3) 
A study of the assimilation of Roman baroque into the national 
traditions of Germany, Flanders, Holland, Spain and France. 

Art 355 Art from Impressionism through 1920 (3) 

Art 356 Contemporary Art (3, 3) 
Art from 1940 to the present. 

Offered 1971-1972. 



Art 359-360 Modern Architecture (2, 2) 

Visual, ethical, historical and practical aspects of twentieth 
century architecture. 

Offered 1971-1972. 

Art 361-362 City Planning (2, 2) 
An analysis of city planning through the ages and the part 
that modern architecture has played in the formation of the 
current urban scene. Not offered 1970-1971. 

Art 363-364 History of the Film (3, 3) 
A survey of the film with emphasis on its cultural and socio- 
logical significance. Includes an introduction to techniques 
necessary for film analysis. 

Art 365-366 Film Genres (3, 3) 

An intensive study of major genres: the comedy, the horror 
film, the western, the experimental film, the star film. 

Offered 1971-1972. 

Art 379 American Art Prior to the Civil War (3) 
Students not majoring in Art or American Studies need the 
permission of the instructor. 

Offered 1971-1972. 

Art 380 American Art from 1865 Through the Present (3) 
Students not majoring in Art or American Studies need the 
permission of the instructor. 

Offered 1971-1972. 

Art 381 Departmental Studies of the Boston Museum of 

Fine Arts (3) 
Specialized studies in the various departments of the BMFA. 
Tours of the museum preceded by lectures. To be taught 
alternate years; open to all art majors and others with per- 
mission. 

Art 383-384 Philosophy of Art (2, 2) 
Offered 1971-1972. 

Art 387-388 Art as Symbol (2, 2) 
A study of the nature and structure of symbol as developed 
in the psychology of Jung, followed by an analysis of the arts 
of various cultures and periods as attempts to give symbolic 
definition to man's relationship with the cosmos. 

Art 387-387W Workshop for Art as Symbol (1,1) 
tVlostly student-initiated projects. Required for those taking 
Art 387 or 388. 



Art 395-396 Art History Seminar (3) 

Special seminar on specific topics. Open to Junior and Senior 
art history majors. 

To be initiated 1971-1972. 

Art 401 Seminar in IVIethods and Criticism (3) 
To be initiated 1971-1972. Open to Senior art majors. 

Art 411 Senior Art History Seminar (1) 
An integration and broadening of the students' experiences 
in various areas. Not to be included as one of the required 
upper-division courses. Graded on a Pass/ Fail basis for both 
Studio and Art History majors. 

Art 451-452 Contemporary Problems Seminar (3, 3) 
This seminar will be given by professors from the History, 
Art, English, and Philosophy Departments. Its purpose is to 
enable the students and the professors involved in it to dis- 
cuss together in depth and in breadth challenging contem- 
porary problems common to the four disciplines, such as the 
person and the community; permanence and change; respon- 
sibility and creativity. The seminar w/ill focus on one central 
problem each year. The selected problem for 1970-1971 is 
that of the person and the community. 

Art 497-498 Independent Studies in History of Art (0-3, 

0-3) 
The student who wishes to take one or two semesters of 
Independent Study will present a typewritten detailed descrip- 
tion of the course requirements as agreed to by the professor 
giving the course and as approved by a representative of the 
Dean's office. Th student must successfully carry through the 
project as outlined. It is only if these conditions are satisfied 
that Independent Study will carry academic credit. Only one 
Independent Study course should be carried in any one 
semester. 

STUDIO ART 

REQUIREMENTS FOR STUDIO MAJORS: 
2 semesters Art 101-102; 2 semesters AS 101-102; 2 semesters 
AS 241-242; 10 upper division courses in the art department, 
of which at least 6 must be in studio, with a grade of or 
better. Seniors should have prepared a portfolio of their best 
representative work. Underclassmen should likewise maintain 
a portfolio which they should be able to submit upon request 
of the department. 

All courses are subject to limited enrollment. 



AS 101-102 Introductory Studio (3, 3) 

A series of interrelated courses designed to give the student 
acquaintance with various skills, techniques, media and view- 
points. 

AS 101a Drawing 
Freehand drawing: a direct interpretation of visual reality, 
natural as well as made, employing various media; investiga- 
tion of experimental techniques and approaches to drawing. 

AS 101b Painting 

Development of oil painting technique through problems of 
design and form. 

AS 102a Design 
The two-dimensional design elements of space, shape, color, 
line and texture considered in drawing and painting. Emphasis 
on traditional and contemporary methods of viewing space. 

AS 102b Media I 
Design elements of texture, color, space, time and sequence 
as inherent in the projected image. 35mm camera recom- 
mended, though not essential. 

AS 181 Color (3) 
Experience with and inquiry into the construction and design 
of color as a force. A studio course using color papers, col- 
lage, found and prepared objects; a final project in any 
medium putting a chosen aspect of this knowledge to work. 

AS 207-208 Figure Drawing I (2, 2) 

A. Gesture and contour drawing from life, with emphasis on 
the structure and the proportional relationships of the human 
body, in realistic rendering. 

B. Studies from the model. Water color, ink, conte, charcoal, 
pencil and acrylic wash; composition and anatomy. 

AS 212 Intermediate Painting (2) 
Figure and still life painting in oils, acrylic and encaustic, 
and problems in abstract design connected with this subject. 
Students not majoring in Art need the permission of the 
instructor. 

AS 217-218 Developmental Painting I (3, 3) 
A studio course designed to allow the student to program a 
series of works that are relevant to the individual. The In- 
tention of this study is to develop the capacity for arriving 
at independent solutions. Oils, acrylic, mixed media. 

AS 231-232 Graphics I (3, 3) 
Relief and stencil printing. A course in printing from raised 



surfaces and stencil templates. Use of wood, masonlte and 
plastic; inking, printing and registration methods. 

AS 241-242 Basic Design (3, 3) 
The exploration of formal possibilities arising out of the nature 
of the various materials used. 

AS 245-246 Environmental Design I (3, 3) 
A preparatory course in architectural techniques, urban de- 
sign, landscaping and allied subjects. 

AS 251-252 Ceramics I (3, 3) 
Fundamental training in clay work: coll and slab projects, 
wheel throwing, and the use of slips and glazes. 

AS 255-256 Weaving I (3, 3) 
An introduction to weaving as a medium of contemporary art. 
Exploration of weaving techniques used in the creation of 
accessories and wall hangings. Experimentation with pattern 
drafts, tapestry weaves, and different types of materials. 

AS 271-272 Photography I (3, 3) 
Introduction to the use of camera and dark room equipment. 
Problems involving use of texture, light, values, etc. 

AS 275-276 Film Making I (3, 3) 
Problems in painting on film (line, color, and mass in motion) 
and animation leading to actual camera work and the use of 
film making equipment. Open to all Junior and Senior art 
majors and others with permission. Prerequisite: AS 271-272 
or its equivalent. 

Offered 1971-1972. 

AS 307-308 Figure Drawing II (2, 2) 
Work in dry brush with emphasis on the modeling of the 
musculature and the forms of the human body. 

AS 309 Conceptual Drawing (3) 
Drawing as records or diagrams descriptive of and resulting 
from thought processes rather than from observed visual 
phenomena. 

AS 317-318 Developmental Painting II (3, 3) 
Continuation of 217-218 on a more advanced level. 

AS 331-332 Graphics II (3, 3) 
More advanced problems in printmaking. 

AS 335-336 Photographic Silk Screen (3, 3) 
Basic techniques of photographic silk screen. One year of 
photography required. 

Offered 1971-1972. 

AS 343-344 Advanced Three-Dimensional Design (3, 3) 
Complex problems and solutions involving plastic unity of 
form. 



AS 345-346 Environmental Design II (3, 3) 

A continuation of AS 245-246 on a more advanced level. 

AS 351-352 Ceramics II (3, 3) 
More advanced problems in ceramics. 

AS 355-356 Weaving II (3, 3) 
Emphasis on creation of original designs in tapestry weaves, 
multiple-harness weaves and three-dimensional weaving. 

AS 370 Grope (3) 
A course to sharpen the student's ability to innovate, be open 
to and recognize discovery. Dialogue with other departments 
and instructors will be sought. 

AS 371-372 Photography II (3, 3) 
More advanced problems in photography including color. 

AS 385-386 Advanced Tutorial I (3, 3) 
Intensive work in a specific area under the direction of a 
mentor. Students taking advanced tutorial should inform the 
chairman in writing. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis. To be 
taught each year; open to Seniors majoring in Art. 

AS 485-486 Advanced Tutorial II (3, 3) 
Intensive work in a specific area under the direction of a 
mentor. No more than one area may be pursued simultane- 
ously. The work, though it may relate to the Senior Project, 
may not be submitted as a part of it. Students taking advanced 
tutorial should inform the chairman in writing. Graded on a 
Pass/Fail basis. 

Classics Program 

The study of the Greek and Roman Classics forms an impor- 
tant part of a liberal education. Courses in this field serve the 
needs of student in various major fields, especially philosophy 
and religion. 

A major in Classics is offered in cooperation with the De- 
partment of Classics at Boston College. Some courses are 
offered at Newton College and a member of the Newton 
College faculty directs the Newton students' programs. The 
scholarly and artistic resources of the Boston area are avail- 
able to students in this field. 

CL L 201-202 Latin Literature (3, 3) 
The choice of materials to be read will be made after discus- 
sion with the students. 

CL G 101-102 Elementary Greek (3,3) 
An introduction to classical Greek. 



Comparative Literature Program 



Economics 



Students majoring in Comparative Literature are required to 
take the following: 

One survey course (or independent study course) in post- 
medieval literature if the student's major interests are classi- 
cal and medieval; one survey course (or independent study 
course) in pre-medieval literature if the student's major in- 
terests are Renaissance to Modern. 
Literary Theory )„_,.._, 
Literary Method) ^^^ ^"^"^^ Department 
12 hours in a primary literature 
6 hours in a secondary literature 
12 hours in Comparative Literature 
Senior Project Seminar 

Students must work closely with an adviser in setting up 
their individual programs. 

Comp L 301-302 Romantic Movement in Europe (3, 3) 
An inquiry into the origins and development of Romanticism 
in literature through study of major works by continental and 
British writers. 

Comp L 303-304 Contemporary European Novel (3, 3) 
Themes and techniques in representative English and contin- 
ental novels from Flaubert to the present. Offered 1971-1972. 

Comp L 305-306 Russian Literature in English Translation 

(3,3) 
Stress is laid in the course upon the interaction between 
Western and Russian intellectual traditions with special refer- 
ence to the Romantic Movement and German Idealism. A 
reading and critical analysis of Russian classics in English 
translation from Pushkin to Pasternak and Nabokov. Includes 
an examination of all Dostoevsky's major works. 

Comp L 307-308 Comparative Romance Literature (3, 3) 
The aim of the course is to offer students of language and 
literature an opportunity to study various literary movements 
in Italy, France and Spain through representative writers. 
The course will concentrate on the variations and interpreta- 
tions of the theme of love (courtly and neoplatonic traditions), 
death, and fate which highlighted the literature of these coun- 
tries during the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. The course 
will be conducted in English, and bilingual texts will be used. 



The economics student is required to present for graduation 
a minimum of eight (8) upper division courses. I.e. of the 300 
level and above, and a satisfactory senior project. The student 
may complete her course requirements from the electives 
offered in the economics department or from any comple- 
mentary discipline depending upon the various academic 
and/or vocational needs and interests of the student. Before 
any interdisciplinary work can be undertaken the student is 
required to submit a written proposal acceptable to the de- 
partments concerned. 

Ec 101-102 Principles of Economics (3, 3) 
Introduction to the basic concepts of economics and the fun- 
damental institutions of economic society. 

Ec 207 Introduction to Mathematical Economics (3) 
A course designed to provide knowledge of the mathematical 
techniques used in modern economics. The topics will in- 
clude: integration and differentiation with applications in the 
theories of the firm and consumer behavior, macro-economic 
models. 

Ec 301 Micro-Economic Analysis (3) 
Micro-Economics: Price theory and distribution analysis. 

Prerequisite: Ec 101-102. 

Ec 302 Macro-Economic Analysis (3) 
Classical, Keynesian and Post-Keynesian aggregative analysis. 

Prerequisite: Ec 101-102. 

Ec 305 Statistics (3) 
Statistical methods as used in economics. Collection and pre- 
sentation of data, index numbers, time series analysis, mea- 
surements of central tendency and dispersion. The normal 
curve and statistical inference. Measurements of simple linear 
correlation. 

Ec 351-352 Comparative Systems (3, 3) 
Study of the theories, origins, history and practices of Capital- 
ism, Communism, Socialism, National Socialism. 

Ec 366 Money and Banking (3) 
A study of the history of banking. Emphasis will be placed 
upon the analysis of deposit creation and central banking. 
An analysis of the objectives and effectiveness of modern 
monetary policy. 

Prerequisite: Ec 1-2. 

Ec 369 Labor Economics 
Theories of wages and employment. Wages and wage sup- 
plements. History of the labor movement. Labor legislation. 



10 



Controversial issues in labor relations. Social security and 
social insurance. International labor organizations. The social 
encyclicals. Human relations in industry. 

Prerequisite: Ec 101-102. 

Ec 401 Advanced Macro-Theory Seminar (3) 
Reading and analysis of modern developments in aggregative 
economic analysis. 

Ec 402 Advanced Micro-Theory Seminar (3) 
Reading and analysis of selected topics in contemporary de- 
velopments in the theory of the firm. 

Ec 405 History of Economic Thought (3) 
Traces development of economic theory from the classical to 
the modern period. Attention is given to historical economics, 
institutional economics, national income economics, and the 
American economic school. 

Ec 497-498 Independent Study in Economics (0-3, 0-3) 
The student who wishes to take one or two semesters of 
Independent Study will present a typewritten detailed descrip- 
tion of the course requirements as agreed to by the professor 
giving the course and as approved by a representative of the 
Dean's office. 

The student must successfully carry through the project as 
outlined. It is only if these conditions are satisfied that Inde- 
pendent study will carry academic credit. 

Only one Independent Study course should be carried in 
any one semester. 

Education 

Courses in education offer an introduction to basic philo- 
sophical, historical, psychological, societal issues. Seminars 
and practicums provide opportunity for involvement and train- 
ing in a variety of educational settings. The total program 
allows students to fulfill the requirements for teacher certifi- 
cation. However, it is directly designed to give them a broad 
vision of educational concerns, and the power to serve those 
concerns beyond the traditional school framework. 

Ed 201-202 Modern Philosophies of Education (3, 3) 
Philosohpical analysis of selected educational problems and 
writings. 

Ed 203-204 Learning Theory (3, 3) 

Ed 301-302 Seminar and Practicum: Elementary Education 

(3,3) 
Discussion, readings and experience in teaching. Students 
observe and participate in learning activities with young chil- 
dren and skills are analyzed in weekly group sessions. 



Ed 303-304 Seminar and Practicum: Urban Education 

(3,3) 
Students elect classroom or community settings for educa- 
tional roles in the city. Discussion and readings will focus on 
student concerns and alternatives for commitment to urban 
service. 

Ed 309-310 Seminar and Practicum: Secondary Education 

(3.3) 
Discussion, readings and experience in teaching. Students 
observe and participate in learning activities with adolescents 
and common concerns are explored in weekly group sessions. 

Ed 313-314 Seminar and Practicum: New Educational 

Models (3, 3) 
Discussions, readings, field trips designed to investigate new 
educational settings in the greater Boston area. The first half 
of the course will be a broad survey of experimental pro- 
grams; the second half will focus on a close study of one 
model at the student's choice. 

Ed 315-316 Planning and Evaluation (3,3) 
Introduction to methods of individual and institutional assess- 
ment. 

Ed 403-404 Individual Instruction or Research: Philosophy 

of Education 
Written proposal to be presented by the student before 
October 1st. 

Ed 407-408 Individual instruction or Research: History of 

Education 
Written proposal to be presented by the student before 
October 1st. 

Ed 409-410 Teaching Art (3, 3) 

Ed 411-412 Teaching Science (3, 3) 

Ed 413-414 Teaching Language (3, 3) 

Ed 415-416 Teaching Social Sciences (3,3) 

Ed 417-418 Teaching Morality (3,3) 

Ed 419-420 Curriculum and Methods: The Elementary 

School (3, 3) 

SCIENCE EDUCATION COURSES 

Sci Ed 401 Methods of Teaching the Biological, Chemical 

and Physical Sciences (4) 

Sci Ed 402 Methods of Teaching the Biological, Chemical 

and Physical Sciences (4) 

Sci Ed 406 Practice Teaching in the Sciences (4) 



11 



English 



Students majoring in Englisli will be required to take: 
Sophomore Year: Eng 215 (Introduction to Literary Theory) 
and Eng 216 (Introduction to Literary Method). Eng 201-202 
(History of English Literature) may be taken any time; it may 
also be waived by passing a qualifying examination. 
Junior or Seriior Year: Eng 311-312 (Shakespeare) and six 
other upper-division courses (numbered 300-410, asterisked) 
selected after consultation with members of the English 
department faculty. Successful completion of a Senior Project 
approved by the department is also required. 

Courses numbered 200-399 are open to non-English majors 
with the permission of the instructor. 

Eng 101-102 Freshman Composition (3,3) 

Eng 201-202 History of English Literature (3, 3) 
A survey of English literature designed to give the student a 
background for more specialized courses. Required of English 
majors: May be waived by passing qualifying examination. 

Eng 215 Introduction to Literary Theory (3) 
Reading and discussion of modern theories of the nature and 
functions of literature. Required of Sophomore English majors. 

Eng 216 introduction to Literary Method (3) 
Practice in critical analysis of fiction and in critical writing 
through the intensive study of a single English or American 
novel. Required of Sophomore English majors. 

Eng 275-276 Short Story (3, 3) 
A course in the writing of short stories (six each semester) 
based on the reading and analysis of contemporary stories. 
Class discussion of students' work. Permission of instructor 
required. 

Eng 285-286 Post-World War II British and American 

Novel (2, 2) 
Reading and discussion of novels by authors who have made 
their reputation since the war, and of later novels of authors 
already well-known before the war. Reading of one novel a 
week. Class meets two hours a week. Open to any Junior or 
Senior. No permission to audit. 

Eng 311-312* Shakespeare (3,3) 
First Semester: Histories and comedies; Second semester: 
Tragedies and romances. Required of English majors. Given 
yearly. 

Eng 321 * Eighteenth Century Novel (3) 
A study in the development of the novel as an art form. 



Authors to be read will include: DeFoe, Richardson, Fielding, 
Smollett, Sterne, Goldsmith, and Fanny Burney. 

Eng 322* Romantic Poetry (3) 
A study of some of the major romantic poets (Wordsworth, 
Coleridge, Keats, Shelly, Byron) emphasizing the critical 
notions of the older poets and the effects on the younger 
group of contemporary political and philosophical notions. 

Eng 341-342* Modern Drama (3, 3) 
Extensive reading and discussion of English, Irish, American 
and some continental dramatists of the twentieth century. 

Eng 349* Satire (3) 
Analysis of the techniques and themes of satire. Discussion 
of the problems involved in defining satire from social, philo- 
sophical, and formatist points of view. Study of a number of 
satiric works selected from a variety of genera and periods, 
ranging from classical times to the present. 

Eng 351-352* Survey of American Literature (3, 3) 
Fall semester: Study of American Literature 17-1 9th century 
with emphasis on developing awareness of the Millennium. 
Spring semester: Disillusionment in the Millennium and the 
American Dream become Nightmare (Walt Whitman — LeRoi 
Jones). 

Eng 353, 354 The Culture of the 60's (3, 3) 
A critical examination of the cultural and social changes of 
the 60's in America as seen through a study of the writings 
of that era. Eng 354 is a repetition of Eng 353, given in the 
second semester. Enrollment limited to 30. 

Eng 355* Seminar in Hawthorne, Melville, and Whitman 

(3) 
In depth analysis of the writing of three of the major creative 
writers of the nineteenth century. The course will examine the 
developing theories and styles of the three authors and relate 
them to their milieu. 

Enrollment limited to 15. Permission of instructor required. 

Eng 356 African Literature in English (3) 
An examination of the developing traditions of the literature 
of the emerging nations of English-speaking Africa. The 
majority of the novels to be studied have been written within 
the last 15 years and deal with such problems as apartheid, 
the destruction of tribal life, the journey to the Europeanized 
African city, and the conflict between the colonized and the 
colonizer. 

Eng 497-498 Independent Study in English (0-3, 0-3) 
The student who wishes to take one or two semesters of 
independent Study will present a typewritten detailed descrip- 



12 



tion of the course requirements as agreed to by the professor 
giving the course and as approved by a representative of the 
Dean's Office. 

The student must successfully carry through the project as 
outlined. It is only if these conditions are satisfied that Inde- 
pendent Study will carry academic credit. 

Only one Independent Study course should be carried in 
any one semester. 

Eng 499 Senior Project (0-3) 

Comp L 301-302* The Romantic Movement in Europe 

(3,3) 
An inquiry into the origins and development of Romanticism 
in literature through study of major works by some continental 
and British writers with consideration of the aesthetic theories 
involved. Open to English and Modern Language majors. 

Eng 451-452 Contemporary Problems Seminar (3,3) 
This seminar will be given by professors from the History, Art, 
English, and Philosophy Departments. Its purpose is to enable 
the students and the professors involved in it to discuss 
together in depth and in breadth challenging contemporary 
problems common to the four disciplines, such as the person 
and the community; permanence and change; responsibility 
and creativity. The seminar will focus on one central problem 
each year. The selected problem for 1970-1971 is that of the 
person and the community. 

History 

REQUIREMENTS: 
Students majoring in history must fulfill the following require- 
ments with a grade of C or better: 

His 101 and 102 is a prerequisite for the taking of any 
upper division courses. In addition the student will take His 
203-204 or His 205-206 and eight upper division semester 
courses. Students may include two semester courses in an 
allied field in their required eight upper division courses with 
the approval of the department chairman. A senior project 
shall be completed in an area of the student's choice. Stu- 
dents planning to attend graduate school are reminded of the 
advisability of choosing their courses with this in mind. This 
should involve an indication of some special field of interest, 
as well as appropriate allied courses which will aid in the 
further study of history. 

The department recommends a seminar course in history 
for all of its students. All majors should submit their proposed 
schedule of courses to the department chairman prior to the 
semester registration. 



The History Department also offers a minor in history to 
those students who complete four upper division courses with 
a grade of C or better. 

His 101 World History Since 1500 (3) 

Analyzes the essential characteristics and experiences of the 
major world regions and those forces or movements, particu- 
larly western expansion, that had a world-wide impact. A 
global perspective of the world since 1500, rather than a 
regional or national view, is the aim of this course. 

His 102 introduction to the Study of History (3) 
An introductory course designed to acquaint the student with 
the problems and the methods of historical study. Required 
of sophomores majoring in history. 

His 203-204 Political and Economic History of the United 

States (3, 3) 
Describes and analyzes the evolution of American Society 
with emphasis on those cultural forces which have helped to 
promote social change. Students will be required to read 
independently in order to develop a command of historical 
fact and theory as well as an appreciation of the development 
of American civilization. 

His 205-206 Social and Cultural History of the United 

States (3, 3) 
Analyzes the evolution of American society from colonial 
times to the present. What Americans thought about them- 
selves and their problems and their response to new ideas of 
science and social criticism, the development of mass cul- 
ture and other social and cultural foundations of modern 
America. The first semester deals with America to 1900 and 
the second semester considers the twentieth century. 

His 332-333 Origins ond Rise of Europe (3, 3) 
An inquiry into the socio-cultural and ideologic foundations 
and operative factors in the formation of the European world 
from Constantine the Great to 1500. 

His 341 Emergence of the Nation States (3) 
A study of the development of the European national states 
from 1500 through the age of Louis XIV. The political effect 
of the Reformation, the nature and effects of the new econ- 
omy, the scientific thought of the seventeenth century and the 
expansions and secularization of the European world. 

His 342 The Age of Rationalism (3) 
A study of the internal development of the major European 
States in the eighteenth century; the international balance of 
power; the rise of the great colonial empires; the Enlighten- 
ment as a European phenomenon. 



13 



His 343 Revolutionary Europe (3) 

This course will deal with the political, social and intellectual 
facets of the European revolutionary movements from 1789 
to 1848. Although the French Revolution of 1789 will be studied 
in detail, great emphasis will also be placed on its general 
impact on European civilization through the Restoration period 
especially in Italy and Germany. 

His 344 Europe in the Age of Realpolitik (3) 

The development of the effects of nationalism, socialism, and 
industrialism on Europe from 1848 to 1914. The great unifica- 
tions, the rise of Marxian socialism, the new imperialism and 
the impact of the shift from romanticism to realism in politics 
will be considered. 

Offered 1971-72. 

His 345 Europe Between the Wars (3) 
A study of the major political, intellectual and socio-economic 
trends in Europe from 1914 to 1939; the impact of war, the 
rise of the totalitarian right, the impact on Europe of Soviet 
Russia. 

His 346 Contemporary Europe (3) 
Major developments in European history since 1939 will be 
analyzed and discussed in their historical context; the prob- 
lems occasioned by World War II, the Cold War, the decline 
of empire, variations in Marxist societies will be among the 
topics studied. 

His 353 History of IVIodern France (3) 
Study of basic problems in French history since 1848. The 
Second Empire, the Third and Fourth Republics, DeGaulle's 
France will be considered against their social, economic and 
cultural background and the changing role of France in 
Europe. 

His 355-356 Main Problems in English History (3, 3) 
A study of major political social and intellectual developments 
in English history since 1066. The approach in this course will 
be a topical as opposed to a purely chronological one. 

Offered 1971-1972. 

His 363 History of Latin America (3) 
A survey of Latin American culture and history including the 
political, social and economic evolution of independent Latin 
America. 

Offered 1971-1972. 

His 364 Contemporary Latin American Problems (3) 
Examination of selected contemporary problems including 



United States-Latin American relations, regional organiza- 
tions, political and social problems. 

Offered 1971-1972. 

His 372 The American Revolution 1763-1789 (3) 
An intensive examination of the causes, consequences, mo- 
tives and meaning of the American Revolution. Reviewed also 
will be the changing historical interpretation and recent re- 
appraisals of the Revolutionary Generation. The Confedera- 
tion period will be examined in relation to the themes of 
change and continuity. This is a reading and discussion 
course with maximum student participation. 

Prerequisites: His 203-204, 205-206. 

His 373-374 American Constitutional Development (3, 3) 
An historical study of the origins of the American constitu- 
tional system (1607-1789); the nature of the federal union and 
who had the power to interpret the constitution (1789-1865) 
and the problems and adjustments of the constitutional sys- 
tem arising from the challenges of a modern, industrialized 
urban society (1865-Present). 

Prerequisite: His 203-204 or 205-206. 

His 375-376 American Foreign Policy (3, 3) 
An historical study of the formulation and implementation of 
a basic United States foreign policy from 1776 to 1900 and 
the subsequent new departures occasioned by the many 
radically different challenges of the twentieth century. Em- 
phasis will be placed on conflicting interpretations. 

His 377-378 Political History of the United States (3, 3) 
An historical examination of the growth of the American na- 
tion from a semirural to a highly urbanized society and the 
American political response to this challenge of change. Im- 
portant topics include: origins, nature and significance of the 
Progressive Movement; the ethnic and economic orientated 
politics of the twenties; Depression; New Deal; rise of the new 
mass-production-consumption economy; the second recon- 
struction and welfare statism from Truman to Johnson. Ap- 
propriate reading assignments comprise an integral part of 
this course. 

Prerequisite: His 203-204 or His 205-206. 

His 381-382 The Black Man in American History (3, 3) 
Fall Semester: 1501 to 1877, from Negro slavery in the West 
Indies to the end of the Reconstruction period in the United 
States. Spring Semester: 1877 to the present time, from the 
beginnings of hard core segregation to the continuing strug- 
gles for full acceptance and equality. 



14 



His 401-402 Seminar in European History (3, 3) 

Study of selected problems in European history since 1815. 
This course will involve readings in original sources. Extensive 
bibliographical usage, oral reports and written papers. The 
seminar paper may be used as a basis for the required Senior 
Essay. Open only to Seniors. 

His 497-498 Independent Study in History (0-3, 0-3) 
The student who wishes to take one or two semesters of 
Independent Study will present a typewritten detailed descrip- 
tion of the course requirements as agreed to by the professor 
giving the course and as approved by a representative of the 
Dean's office. 

The student must successfully carry through the project as 
outlined. It is only if these conditions are satisfied that Inde- 
pendent Study will carry academic credit. 

Only one Independent Study course should be carried in 
any one semester. 

His 451-452 Contemporary Problems Seminar (3, 3) 
This seminar will be given by professors from the History, 
Art, English, and Philosophy Departments. Its purpose is to 
enable the students and the professors involved in it to dis- 
cuss together in depth and in breadth challenging contempo- 
rary problems common to the four disciplines, such as the 
person and the community; permanence and change; respon- 
sibility and creativity. The seminar will focus on one central 
problem each year. The selected problem for 1970-1971 is 
that of the person and the community. 

Interdisciplinary Courses 

IS 101-102 The Study of World Cultures I (5, 5) 
IS 201-202 The Study of World Cultures 11 (5, 5) 

The course provides an opportunity to single out for attention 
the great problems which have faced Western man. By way 
of comparison, other cultures are drawn upon to illuminate the 
manner in which mankind has grappled with its questions — 
political, social, economic, philosophical, artistic and re- 
ligious. A list of readings centering largely on the great 
masterpieces of the world gives depth to the treatment of the 
material. The course, which is a "study", not a "survey", is 
interdisciplinary in nature and selective in its coverage. It 
seeks to bring about an "illumination of the mind" rather 
than the mere retention of a mass of facts. 



IS 103 Contemporary World Culture I (3) 

Cultural Dimensions Studied Through the Film Medium 

"The Art of Ingmar Bergman" 

This course will explore the anthropological situation of 
Western Europe today through a presentation and analysis of 
the work of Ingmar Bergman. Attention will be paid to the 
basic attitude of Bergman's post-war concern for 'meaning in 
life' and the expression of this concern in the typical themes 
of love and death, alienation, misanthropy, identity, etc., and 
their symbolic representation. 

Art 451-452 Contemporary Problems Seminar (3, 3) 

Eng 451-452 

His 451-452 

Phil 451-452 

Problems such as permanence and change, the person and 
the community, response-ability and creativity or the role of 
the Christian in a secularizing world will be discussed. Those 
contemporary problems of greatest significance to them will 
be chosen by the students. Readings will vary according to 
the problems selected each year. 
Limited to 15 students. 

Liberal Studies Program 

The Libera! Studies Program, begun in September 1970, is 
Newton's first large scale model for a curriculum which will 
not be discipline-centered and yet will give the student a co- 
ordinated learning experience, equip her with basic skills for 
thinking along the lines of several disciplines, and provide 
her the opportunity to cooperate with faculty advisors in 
shaping her own undergraduate career. Students who are 
selected to pursue this program must choose some fairly 
specific problem to be solved or movement to be investigated, 
and suggest how, within the resources of Newton's academic 
offerings, they plan to proceed. There is a Coordinator of 
Liberal Studies who must approve this plan, which should be 
neither too narrow nor too vague. Approached with intelligent 
curiosity and open-mindedness, and carried out with thorough- 
ness and accuracy, such a plan will lead the student into many 
fields. She will want to know what has already been discov- 
ered or suggested about her problem or movement. She will 
need to assess the answers already given and the kind of 
reasoning which has led to these answers. This need will 
urge her to examine the conditions, social, political, religious. 



15 



philosophical and perhaps economic, which precipitated or 
influenced earlier efforts to deal with the questions concerned. 
It is clear that any superficiality in handling the multiple 
phases of these questions will be unsatisfactory to the serious 
student, who must yet, in the end, decide on one phase on 
which she may focus the results of her wide-ranging research. 
In this program, therefore, the Senior Project is particularly 
important. It will always consist of a somewhat lengthy schol- 
arly paper, frequently linked — depending upon the subject — to 
field work. This paper will be the principal evidence of the 
success of the program, and will occupy considerable time in 
the last year of study. 

It is clear that the human development of the student is 
more important than the solution of a problem. For this 
reason, the Coordinator of Liberal Studies will keep as closely 
as possible in touch with the students engaged in this program, 
and periodically review how their investigations are progress- 
ing, so as to assure that the learning experience is synthe- 
sized, and that there is sufficient richness and variety in the 
experience to make it worthy to be synthesized. 

The early years of this new departure in curriculum will 
gradually establish for it a firm though flexible pattern; stu- 
dent pioneers who opt for it must therefore realize that its 
success and survival depend on their working to make it 
quite visibly succeed. 

A student who wants to substitute Liberal Studies for an- 
other major field will submit in writing to the Coordinator the 
problem or project which is the focus of her interest and a 
list of the courses which she proposes to take in the remain- 
ing semesters of her college career. It is understood that this 
list may be tentative and partial. It will be reviewed, and 
perhaps changed, each semester. The original plan on the 
basis of which the student will be accepted into the Liberal 
Studies Program or not may be submitted at the end of any 
semester, except the last two of the student's academic resi- 
dence* at the college. The Liberal Studies Advisory Board 
will consider the plan and together with the Coordinator will 
decide upon its suitability. 

Mathematics 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJORS 
Math 202, 301, 303 plus 5 semester courses at the upper 
division level (courses numbered above 300); a satisfactory 
completion of a Senior Project. 



For students interested in areas of Mathematics not covered 
by our program, there is the possibility of participation in a 
cooperative program with other institutions in the area. 

Students who intend to major in Mathematics are advised to 
study one of the following languages: Russian, German or 
French. 

Any course listed below is open to any qualified student. 

Math 101-102 Introduction to Analysis (5,5) 
A rigorous study of the concepts of function, limit, derivative 
and integral. 

Math 105-106 Calculus I (4,4) 
A course in calculus with emphasis on applications. 

Math 107-108 Introduction to Probability (3, 3) 
A study of the theory of probability for discrete sample spaces 
and an introduction to the concepts of random variable and 
probability function with applications to the social sciences. 

Math 108 is a repetition of Math 107. 

Math 109-110 Mathematical Experiences (3,3) 
The objectives of the course are an understanding of what 
Mathematics is and an appreciation of Mathematics as a vital, 
on-going creation. Ideas — not content — will be stressed. 
Open-ended problems will be used as a means of providing 
the experience of discovering possible mathematical relation- 
ships, of making conjectures about them, and of proving or 
disproving them. Recommended to non-mathematics majors 
and prospective teachers. A student may take Math 109 or 
Math 110 or both. (Math 110 does not depend on Math 109.) 

Math 201 Intermediate Analysis (5) 
A study of elementary differential equations, sequences, se- 
ries, improper integrals, and sequences and series of func- 
tions. 

Math 202 Linear Algebra (5) 
A study of vector spaces, linear transformations, matrices and 
systems of linear equations. 

Math 205-206 Calculus II (3, 3) 
A continuation of Math 105-106. An optional weekly problem 
session is available. 

Math 301 Advanced Calculus (3) 
Elementary point-set topology and functions of several vari- 
ables, treated in detail. 

Math 302 Vector Valued Functions (3) 
A study of vector valued functions of several variables. 

Math 303 Algebra I (3) 
Elementary theory of Groups, Rings and Fields. 



16 



Math 304 Algebra II (3) 

The content of this course may vary from year to year and 
will depend on the interests of the students and of the in- 
structor. The following options, among others, will be avail- 
able: 

Selected topics in the Theory of Finite Groups 

introduction to the Theory of Rings and Homology 

Introduction to the Theory of Fields and Galois Theory. 

Math 305 Introduction to the Theory of Numbers (3) 
A study of the basic concepts of the theory of numbers. 
Topics include congruences, Diophantine equations, continued 
fractions. 

Offered in 1971-1972. 

Math 306 Intermediate Probability (3) 
A study of the Probability Theory which assumes some knowl- 
edge of the basic concepts of calculus. 

Offered in 1971-1972. 

Math 307 Numerical Analysis (3) 
A study of linear and non-linear equations, interpolation and 
more general methods of approximation. 

Math 308 Elementary Geometry from an Advanced Stand- 
point (3) 
A study of Euclidean geometry and a non-Euclidean geom- 
etry. Sets of postulates will be given and the question of 
their consistency examined. 

Math 401 Introduction to Measure Theory (3) 
Lebesgue measure, Lebesgue integral and its relation to the 
Riemann integral. 

Math 402 Introduction to Topology (3) 
Topological spaces and their properties. 

Math 403-404 Functions of the Complex Variable (3, 3) 
A study of Cauchy-Riemann equations, contour integration, 
Laurent series, calculus of residues, conformal mapping, 
Dirichiet problem. 

Math 497-498 Independent Study in Mathematics (0-3, 

0-3) 
Independent programs of reading and research in an area of 
the student's choice. Open only to Juniors and Seniors. 

The student who wishes to take one or two semesters of 
Independent Study will present a typewritten detailed de- 
scription of the course requirements as agreed to by the 
professor giving the course and as approved by a repre- 
sentative of the Dean's Office. 



The student must successfully carry through the project as 
outlined. It Is only if these conditions are satisfied that Inde- 
pendent Study will carry academic credit. 

Only one Independent Study course should be carried In 
any one semester. 

Math 011-012 Introduction to Computing (3,3) 
Algorithms, programs, programming, verification and debug- 
ging of programs; the solution of computational problems 
through the uses of languages including FORTRAN. 

Offered in 1971-1972. 

Division of Modern Languages 

The minimum requirements for the major are: 
Single Language Major: 

8 credit hours in Elementary courses or qualifying profici- 
ency test; 
6 credit hours in Intermediate courses or qualifying pro- 
ficiency test; 
25 credit hours In Upper Division courses with the following 
distribution: 

a. 6 credit hours in Advanced Composition and Conversa- 
tion courses; 

b. 12 credit hours in Literature courses; 

c. 4 credit hours in Linguistics; 

d. 3 credit hours of independent studies or seminar; 

e. Senior Project. 

Total number of required credits = 39 

Modern Language Major: 
A. Major Language — 

8 credit hours In Elementary courses or qualifying pro- 
ficiency test; 
6 credit hours In Intermediate courses or qualifying pro- 
ficiency test; 
18 credit hours in Upper Division courses with the follow- 
ing distribution: 

a. 6 credit hours in Advanced Composition and Con- 
versation; 

b. 12 credit hours in Literature courses; 
4 credit hours In Linguistics; 

Senior Project. 



17 



B. Minor Language — 

8 credit hours in Elementary courses or qualifying pro- 
ficiency test; 
6 credit hours in Intermediate courses or qualifying pro- 
ficiency test; 
12 credit hours in Upper Division courses with the follow- 
ing distribution: 

a. 6 credit hours in Advanced Composition and Con- 
versation courses; 

b. 6 credit hours in Survey of Literature. 
Total number of required credits = 62 

Students are invited to visit with the professors of the 
Division of Modern Languages for more information on quali- 
fying tests, courses offered abroad, senior project, and inde- 
pendent studies. 

ML 301-302 Introduction to Linguistics (2, 2) 
This course, to be taken by all Modern Language majors, will 
provide for special assignment in the individual target lan- 
guage. It will cover the following: phonetics and phonology of 
language; principles of structural linguistics; a survey of mod- 
ern grammars; semantics; etymology, essentials of historical 
linguistics; the principal theories on the psychology and 
philosophy of language. 

IVIL 497-498 Independent Studies in Modern Languages 

(0-3, 0-3) 
The student who wishes to take one or two semesters of 
Independent Study will present a typewritten detailed descrip- 
tion of the course requirements as agreed to by the professor 
giving the course and as approved by a representative of the 
Dean's Office. 

The student must successfully carry through the project as 
outlined. It is only if these conditions are satisfied that Inde- 
pendent Study will carry academic credit. 

Only one Independent Study course should be carried in 
any one semester. 

FRENCH 

Fr 101-102 Elementary French (4,4) 
For the student with little or no previous knowledge of French 
who wishes to achieve a basis for an active command of the 
language. Three class sessions will be devoted to the acquisi- 
tion of reading and writing skills and two laboratory sessions 
will be devoted to aural-oral practice for study and adaptation 
of fundamental speech patterns each week. 

Offered every year. 



Fr 201-202 Intermediate French (4, 4) 

The intensive course is intended to develop the four skills of 
the language: understanding, speaking, reading and writing. 
The classes will be devoted to grammar, oral drills and lab- 
oratory sessions. (Five classes per week) 

Offered every year. 

Fr 203-204 French Conversation (3, 3) 
Intensive work in speech patterns, diction and grammar re- 
view. 

Offered every year. 

Fr 205-206 Advanced Intermediate French (3, 3) 
A review of the fundamentals of the language supplemented 
by reading of literature and cultural material and by practice 
in oral expression. 

Offered every year. 

Fr 207-208 French Advanced Conversation (3, 3) 
Practice in the oral use of the language — intensive study of 
vocabulary, structures, and idiomatic expressions. 

Fr 209-210 Oral and Written French (3, 3) 
For the students whose purpose is to acquire aural-oral skills 
and greater competency in reading and oral comprehension 
of French. Systematic review of French grammar and introduc- 
tion to French phonetics. 

Offered every year. 

Fr 211-212 Laboratory and Diction (1,1) 
This advanced course is intended for French majors and 
Modern language majors and is offered every year. 

Fr 301-302 French Composition and Stylistics (3, 3) 
A course designed to increase the correctness and effective- 
ness of the student's written expression through varied types 
of French composition and through introduction to stylistics. 

Offered every year. 

Fr 303-304 Survey of French Literature (3, 3) 
A historical and critical study of the important literary move- 
ments and the most representative authors of French litera- 
ture from the Middle Ages to the present. Required of French 
majors and Modern Language majors. 

Conducted in French and offered every year. 

Fr 305-306 French Civilization (2, 2) 
The purpose of this lecture course is to give a general knowl- 
edge of the historical and cultural background of France, 
some notions of its geographical aspects, the growth of its 
arts, sciences and institutions. The second semester will be 
devoted to contemporary France. 



18 



Offered every year. 

Prerequisite: a good understanding of spoken French as 
the course will be conducted in French. 

Fr 307 French Literature of the Middle Ages (3) 
The origin and the growth of literary genres in France, from 
the tenth through the fifteenth century. Analysis of old epic 
legends, novels of chivalry, "Fabliaus", medieval drama and 
lyric poetry from the songs of the troubadours to the Testa- 
ment of Frangois Villon. 

Offered in 1971-72 and alternate years. 

Fr 308 The Renaissance in France (3) 
A study of the historical, philosophical and literary movements 
which molded the French Renaissance; selections from 
Marot, Rabelais, the poets of the "Pleiade", Montaigne and 
others. 

Offered 1971-72 and alternate years. 

Fr 310 Seminar: The Humanists (3) 
A study of the works of Rabelais, Montaigne and the human- 
ist movement in the 16th and 17th century. 

Offered in 1970-71 and alternate years. 

Fr 311 Seminar: Corneille, Racine, lUloliere (3) 
The development of the classic theater: new theories of the 
dramatic, the tragic and the comic. Literary analysis of the 
dramaturgists' masterpieces. Conducted in French. 

Seminar offered in 1970-71 and alternate years. 

Fr 312 French Classicism (3) 
The elaboration, fixation and realization of the French Classic 
doctrine as seen through the poetry and prose of seventeenth 
century French Literature. Study of the most representative 
works of great poets, moralists, fabulists and mondain writers. 
Outside reading required. Conducted in French. 

Offered in 1971-72 and alternate years. 

Fr 313 The Age of Enlightenment (3) 
An investigation of the changing concept of man and its in- 
fluence on social and political thought as seen through 
Montesquieu, Diderot, Voltaire, Rousseau. 

Offered in 1970-71 and alternate years. 

Fr 314 The 18th Century Theatre in France (3) 
A study of the evolution of the 18th century theatre in France 
as seen through the works of Marivaux, Beaumarchais, 
Lesage, Dancourt, Voltaire, Diderot and his disciples. 

Offered in 1970-71 and alternate years. 



Fr 315 Seminar: Romantic Poetry of the 19th Century 

(3) 
The literary doctrine, themes and artistic virtuosity of the 
romantic poets as they appear in the most significant works 
of Lamartine, Hugo, Vigny and Musset. 

Offered 1970-71 and alternate years. 

Fr 317 French Novel 1800-1850 (3) 
This course studies selected novelists from the French Revo- 
lution to Balzac. 

Offered 1971-72 and alternate years. 

Fr 318 Nineteenth Century French Novel (3) 
Historical and critical study of the various literary movements 
and the major works of the novelists of the nineteenth cen- 
tury: Realism and naturalism. Extensive reading required. 

Offered in 1970-71 and alternate years. 

Fr 320 19th Century French Theatre (3) 
A study of the evolution of the 19th Century theatre in France. 

Offered in 1971-72 and alternate years. 

Fr 321 The Short Story in France (3) 
The major trends of the short story of the 19th and 20th 
Century are considered. Intensive reading of works of Merimee, 
Daudet, Maupassant, Anatole France and others will be re- 
quired. 

Offered 1971-72 and alternate years. 

Fr 322 Seminar: Baudelaire, Verlaine, Rimbaud (3) 
An insight into the symbolist poetical expression. 

Offered 1971-72 and alternate years. 

Fr 323 Twentieth Century French Novel I (3) 
Extensive readings and discussions of the works of Proust as 
well as selected works by the most representative authors of 
the century prior to World War II (Gide, Montherlant, Malraux, 
Mauriac, Bernanos and Giono). 

Offered in 1970-71 and alternate years. 

Fr 324 Twentieth Century French Novel II (3) 
The effects of changes in the philosophical and literary aes- 
thetics in France as reflected in the works of the existentialist 
authors Sartre, Camus, Beauvois and Marcel. The "Nouveau 
Roman" and its search for new ways of expression. 

Offered 1970-71 and alternate years. 

Fr 325 Twentieth Century French Theater (3) 
Discussion of plays from the French Theater since 1920 to the 
present. Outside reading required. Conducted in French. 

Offered in 1971-72 and alternate years. 



19 



GERMAN 

Ger 101-102 Elementary German (4,4) 
Three class sessions will be devoted to essentials of grammar 
and the acquisition of reading and writing sl<ills. In addition: 
two laboratory sessions of aural-oral practice. 

Offered every year. 

Ger 201-202 Intermediate German (3, 3) 
This course aims at the further development of the four skills 
of language — understanding, speaking, reading, and writing. 
Three class sessions will be devoted to reading and discuss- 
ing works of literary merit and cultural interest and to a 
complete grammar review. In addition two laboratory sessions 
of aural-oral practice. (Optional). Course conducted primarily 
in German. 

Offered every year. 

Ger 203-204 German Conversation and Composition 

(3,3) 
Practice in the written and oral use of the language. Intensive 
study of vocabulary, idiomatic expressions, and phonetics. 

Offered every year. 

Ger 301-302 Survey of German Literature (3, 3) 
Lectures in German; reading and discussion of typical works 
of each period. 

Fall semester: German literature from the medieval period 
to Goethe. 

Spring semester: German literature from Romanticism to 
the present day. 

Offered 1970-71 and alternate years. 

Ger 303-304 German Civilization (3, 3) 

An intensive study through German texts of the cultural and 
historical background of the German speaking peoples. 

Fall semester: From the beginning to the Baroque Period. 

Spring semester: From the Age of Enlightenment to the 
present. 

Offered 1971-72 and alternate years. 

Ger 305-306 German Literature In the Eighteenth Century 

(3,3) 
Lectures in German on the nature and background of 18th 
century. Reading and discussion of representative works with 
emphasis on Lessing, Goethe, and Schiller. 

Offered 1970-71 and alternate years. 

Ger 307-308 Contemporary German Literature (3, 3) 
Literary trends in Germany and Austria from 1885 to the 
present. Extensive reading. Conducted in German. 

Offered 1971-72 and alternate years. 



Ger 309-310 Advanced German Conversation and Compo- 
sition (2, 2) 
Intensive training in the use of correct grammatical and idio- 
matic constructions. Advanced stylistics. Oral and written 
reports on selected topics will be required. 
Offered 1970-71 and alternate years. 
Ger 312 German Seminar (3) 
Subject to be announced. Can be elected as Senior Project. 

ITALIAN 

Students interested in Italian Studies must visit with the pro- 
fessors of the Department for personal counsel on matters 
related to the level of proficiency for the selection of courses, 
credits, and other academic responsibilities. 

It 101-102 Elementary Italian (4,4) 
Introduction to Italian language through basic conversation 
patterns and essentials of grammar. Weekly laboratory ses- 
sion. 

It 201-202 Intermediate Italian (3-3) 
Continuation of It 1-2, with stress on oral expression and 
composition. Basic elements of grammar will be integrated 
with reading of Italian texts. The course is open to students 
who have completed elementary courses in other institutions. 
Weekly laboratory session. Conducted in Italian. 

It 251-252 Advanced Italian (3-3) 
While the emphasis of the course will be on the development 
of language skills through intensive conversations and com- 
positions, the student will be introduced to various aspects of 
Italian culture and history. Conducted in Italian. 

It 301-302 Italian Literature I (3-3) 
Following a series of lectures on literary precepts and theo- 
ries, the Italian literary language, and some principles of 
aesthetics, during the first semester the course will follow the 
development of lyric poetry and related literary movements. 
Emphasis will be placed on the works of Dante, Petrarch, 
Lorenzo de Medici, Poliziano and Pulci. 

The development of Italian prose and its various manifesta- 
tions will be studied during the second semester. Emphasis 
will be placed on Boccaccio, Machiavelli, and selected writers 
of the Renaissance. Conducted in Italian. 

(Not offered in 1970-71) 

RUSSIAN 

Rus 101-102 Elementary Russian (4,4) 
Simplified Russian Grammar supplemented by elementary 
reading from Graded Readers. Some practice in speaking the 
language. One hour of language laboratory work required. 



20 



Rus 201-202 Intermediate Russian (3,3) 
Advanced grammar. Reading of selected prose. Scientific 
Russian. Translation of scientific and technical texts. 

Rus 301-302 Survey of Russian Literature in Russian 

(3,3) 
Readings in Russian of the major works of Russian literature 
from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Conducted in 
Russian. 

Rus 303-304 Russian Civilization (3, 3) 
The purpose of this course is to introduce the language stu- 
dent to Russian civilization: history, art, music, and the 
geography and economy of the Soviet Union. Conducted in 
Russian. 

Rus 305-306 Russian Conversation and Composition 

(2,2) 
Elementary conversation with intense study of vocabulary and 
practice in speaking. 

Prerequisite: Rus 101-102. 

Rus 307-308 Advanced Russian Conversation and Com- 
position (2, 2) 
Intensive practice in writing and speaking Russian. 

SPANISH 

Sp 111-112 Elementary Spanish (4,4) 
An introductory course using the oral-aural approach. This 
course is intended to develop the four skills of languages: 
speaking, understanding, reading and writing. 

Sp 113-114 Intermediate Spanish (3,3) 
Continuation of Elementary Spanish at a more advanced level. 
Practice in composition and conversation. Readings of easy 
works and discussions on everyday topics. 

Sp 221-222 Advanced Composition and Stylistics (2, 2) 
Introduction to the varied types of literary composition in 
Spanish narration, with descriptive literary analysis. 

Sp 241-242 Advanced Oral and Written Spanish (3, 3) 
Intensive training in correct expression in both written and 
spoken language. Oral and written reports on topics of Span- 
ish cultural and current Interest. Reading and analysis of 
modern Spanish plays. 

Sp 321-322 Survey of Spanish Literature (3, 3) 
An historical and critical study of the important literary move- 
ments and the most representative authors of Spanish litera- 
ture from the Middle Ages to the twentieth century. Required 
of Modern Language Majors if Spanish is elected as one of 
their languages. 



Sp 325 Latin American Civilization (3) 

A general survey of the most characteristic cultural move- 
ments of Ibero America. 

Sp 326 Spanish Civilization (3) 
A study of the cultural contributions of Spain to western 
civilization. 

Sp 327-328 Spanish Medieval Literature (3, 3) 
A study of the most significant currents in Spanish poetry and 
prose (twelfth through fifteenth centuries). 

Not offered in 1970-1971. 

Sp 341 Spanish Literature of the Golden Centuries: Lyric 

(3) 
The aim of the course Is the presentation of Spanish lyric 
poetry of the XV, XVI, and XVII centuries as a continuous 
evolution of form and content. Representative works of Gar- 
cilaso, Herrera, Fray Luis de Leon, and San Juan de la Cruz 
will be studied. 

Sp 342 Spanish Literature of the Golden Centuries: Prose 

(3) 
Following the method of study and analysis of Sp 341, the 
course will focus on the development of prose in Spain during 
the Golden Centuries. Among other representative works. El 
Lazarillo de Tormes and Don Quijote de la Mancha will be 
studied and considered in the light of recent interpretations. 

Sp 351 Spanish Drama (3) 
A study of the evolution of the Spanish theatre from the 
Golden Age, through an examination of the works of major 
playwrights. 

Offered 1971-1972. 

Sp 352 Spanish Literature of the Nineteenth Century (3) 
Analysis of the principal literary movements in Spain during 
the nineteenth century. Study of the most representative 
writers: Espronceda, Valera, Becquer, Galdos, Blasco Ibaiiez 
and others. 

Offered 1971-1972. 

Sp 355 The Generation of '98 (3) 
A study of the ideological and literary contribution of Una- 
muno, Azorin, Baroja, Valle Inclan, Machado and others. An- 
alysis of their most outstanding works. 

Sp 356 Contemporary Spanish Novel (3) 
A study of the literary trends and the works of significant 
writers of post Civil War Spain. Works of Cela, Laforet, 
Delibes, Matute and others will be discussed. 



21 



Music 



Mus 101 Basic Theory of Music (4) 

An introduction to the study of music history. 
Mus 201-202 Survey of Western Music (3, 3) 

First Semester: History of the music of the Western World to 
1750. Second Semester: History of the music of the Western 
World from 1750 to the present. 
Prerequisite: Mus 101. 

Mus 204 History of Keyboard Music (3) 

Fall Semester: A study of the nature of the harpsichord, clavi- 
chord, piano and organ, and of the music written for them 
from the Elizabethan period to 1970. 

Spring Semester: From 1750 to the present. 

Mus 209-210 Opera and Ballet (3,3) 
The study of opera and ballet as related arts. Required at- 
tendance at performances will be equivalent to the third hour 
of class. The student must register for the full year. Graded 
Pass/Fail. 

Mus 241-242 Bach and Mozart (3, 3) 
A comparative study of the lives and works of Bach and 
Mozart with attention to the historical position of each. Em- 
phasis on the development of musical form in the Baroque 
and Classical periods. 

Mus 243-244 Mahler to the Present (3, 3) 
The history of contemporary music from the time of Mahler 
to the present. An examination of the breakdown of tonality 
as it has been known since Monteverdi will be made. Some 
electronic music. Concert attendance required. 



Philosophy 



Each student will work out her own program with the advice 
of the department. She will be required to complete, with a 
minimum grade of C, ten courses offered by the Philosophy 
Department. 

Phil 111-112 Logical Techniques of Thought and Argu- 
ment (3, 3) 
The aim is to provide a nontechnical introduction to the prin- 
ciples and methods of sound reasoning. Topics include the 
uses and functions of language, symbolism and sign-using 
behavior, the nature of language, meaning and communica- 
tion, special types of discourse. Detailed practice in interpre- 
tation and inference. Deductive and inductive methods in 
argumentation, critical analysis, and practical decisions. The 



logic of propositions and classes; truth-functional analysis; 
quantification; proofs-of-validity and soundness of arguments. 
Inductive procedures; analogical arguments; probability in- 
ferences. 

Phil 111, first semester, is offered in consecutive years. 

Phil 112, second semester, is offered in alternate years. 

Phil 121 History of Philosophy I (3) 
Pre-Socrates to Locke. 

Phil 122 History of Philosophy II (3) 
Locke to Present. 

An introduction to some of the basic ideas of the main 
philosophers in the history of Western thought. Stress will be 
placed on problems pertinent to the contemporary world. The 
class will read the same primary sources and groups within 
the class will read different secondary sources, then compare 
them in relation to the primary sources. 

Phil 123 Introduction to Philosophical Anthropology I 

(3) 
Offered 1971-1972. 

Phil 124 Introduction to Philosophical Anthropology II 

(3) 
Study of selected representative approaches to the meaning 
of man in Western philosophical tradition. An attempt will be 
made to answer Kant's questions, what can I know? what 
ought I to do? what can I hope for? what is man? in the 
light of different philosophical schools. 

Offered 1971-1972. 

Phil 127, 128 Logic (3) 
A study of the operations of the human mind — abstraction, 
judgment and reasoning — with emphasis on the practical ap- 
plication of the law of logic. Exercises will be assigned for 
home study which should aid the student in her search for 
clarity of thought and expression. This course will be offered 
twice each year. Phil 128 is the equivalent of 127 but is of- 
fered in the Spring semester. 

Phil 152 Philosophical Method: Its Nature and Applica- 
tions (3) 
A study of the main characteristics, problems, and the con- 
tinuing challenges of philosophical inquiry. The integrative 
and the critical values in the application of the philosophical 
method: (a) for the assessment of the intellectual products of 
our civilization in a variety of areas (including morality, poli- 
tics, religion, social and natural sciences, etc.) and (b) for the 
formulation of one's personal concepts, beliefs, and views. 



22 



Through readings in diverse fields, an attempt will be made to 
exhibit what may be called the rationale in appraising the 
problems of a broad relevance to human concerns. The 
course will be conducted as a seminar. 

Phil 205-206 Modern Philosophy (3, 3) 
Systematic study and critical analysis of the main works of 
the following philosophers: Descartes, Spinoza, Locke, Berk- 
eley, Hume, Leibniz, Kant, Hegel, and Schopenhauer. 

Fall Semester: Ethics and Value Theory. 

Spring Semester: Theory of Knowledge. 

The second semester may be taken without the first. 

Phil 223 Philosophy of Religion (3) 
A phenomenological approach to the meaning of religion, with 
stress placed on some of the epistemological problems of 
religion, and a study of some of the answers given by psy- 
chology and mysticism. An attempt will be made to discover 
the relation of metaphysics to religion. 

Phil 226 Philosophy of the Community (3) 
A study of the communities of friendship, marriage, family, 
state, nation and church, and of their relations to one another. 

Phil 251 Contemporary Problems in Moral and Social 

Philosophy (3) 
An examination of the philosophical and moral doctrines in- 
volved in such social conceptions as utility, the common 
good, natural law and natural rights, justice and equality, 
tolerance and liberty. 

Offered 1971-1972. 

Phil 262 Problems in Ethics and the Philosophy of Mind 

(3) 
A study of the current ideas concerning man's mora! conduct 
in the light of his intellectual commitments, as interpreted by 
some major philosophers and moralists — the British Utilitar- 
ians, Butler, Kant, Moore, Stevenson, Ross, Baier, Perry, Hare, 
and others. 

Offered: 1971-1972. 

Phil 271 Values and the Contemporary Man (3) 
Contemporary man's search for values in a rapidly changing 
world where traditional values are collapsing will be investi- 
gated mainly through the media of literature, film and art. 

Phil 272 Philosophy of Creativity (3) 
An inquiry into the possibility of a new philosophy of man 
based on his essential creativity. Extensive study of the ideas 
of thinkers who discuss man's new responsibility as creator 
of the world around him and his creative responsibility to his 



fellow men. The ideas of Berdyaev, Maslow, Kierkegaard, 
Erich Fromm, Teilhard de Chardin, Sartre, Alan Watts and 
Gabriel Marcel on this subject will be investigated. 

Offered: 1971-1972. 

Phil 301-302 History and Philosophy of Science (3, 3) 
An examination of man's recent attempts, in their cultural 
contexts, to understand the physical environment. Historical 
and critical study of the development of modern scientific 
methods and fundamental concepts in natural and behavioral 
sciences. 

Topics include: (a) the development of the concepts of 
matter, force, energy, and dynamics; structure and function; 
emergence, evolution, and natural selection; behaviorism and 
purposivism; (b) types of explanation; verification; causality; 
theory making and concept formation; reduction; measure- 
ment; the nature of explanations of human actions. 

This course presupposes no specialized background in 
science and is intended both for those who do not expect to 
take further work in science or related subjects and for those 
who may wish to continue in the natural or the behavioral 
sciences. 

The second semester may be taken without the first with 
the consent of the Instructor. 

Phil 304 Philosophy of Language (3) 
A detailed study of the nature and uses of language In order 
to develop a viable philosophical method of analysis. Sym- 
bolism, meaning and use, sign-using behavior, and special 
types of discourse. The use of the philosophical method based 
on a linguistic conception of philosophy to achieve results on 
such subjects as mind, behavior, morals, understanding, cer- 
tainty, and belief. The decisive and dominant influence of 
this philosophical method on the current Anglo-American 
philosophy. Readings in the major works of Wittgenstein, 
Wisdom, Anscombe, Geach, Malcolm, Ryle, Austin, and others. 

Phil 307 Symbolic Logic (3) 
Introduction to the current methods of formal logic and logi- 
cal analysis. The theory of truth functions and prepositional 
calculus; normal schemata and Boolean expansions; duality; 
proofs of consistency and validity. Properties, development, 
and interpretation of axiomatic theories (logistic systems). 
Calculus of functions: uniform quantification and methods of 
natural deduction; general theory of quantification. Introduc- 
tion to the theories of identity, classes, and relations. Theory 
of descriptions. Logical and semantical paradoxes. Applica- 
tions in the analysis of argumentative prose. 



23 



This course presupposes no specialized training in logic or 
mathematics. 

Phil 311-312 Seminar in Philosophy In Literature (4,4) 
An investigation of philosophical insights concerning the 
problems, the conduct, and the condition of human life, as 
they appear in a selection of literary and philosopihcal works. 
Members of the seminar will select the works to be discussed 
and the reading list will be open to revision during the course 
of the seminar. The emphasis will be on discussion. The 
seminar will require a strong intellectual motivation of its 
members and their close interaction within the group. An 
attempt will be made to conduct this seminar interdepart- 
mentally whenever possible. 

Fall Semester: Topic: Issues in a New Generation, includ- 
ing revolution, violence, war, civil disobedience, drugs, tech- 
nology, and religious freedom. Selection of readings in: 
Marcuse, Paz, Guevara, Westermarck, Wellman, Bentham, 
Mill, Machiavelli, Hitler, Marx. 

Spring Semester: Topic: Ethical Perspectives and Moral 
Dilemmas in the Problem of Freedom. Selection of readings 
in: Sophocles, Kalidasa, Dante, Goethe, Dostoevski, Camus, 
Kierkegaard, Sartre, Kafka, Gandhi, Niebuhr, Bergson, Hem- 
ingway, Faulkner, Joyce. 

Two two-hour discussions weekly. The second semester 
may be taken without the first. 

Phil 321 American Philosophy (3) 
Jonathan Edwards to Sidney Hook inclusive. General histori- 
cal trends, together with an analysis of the principal texts of 
William James, Josiah Royce, John Dewey and Alfred North 
Whitehead. 

Phil 322 Philosophical Presuppositions of Contemporary 

America 
Besides contemporary philosophical works, plays, movies, 
novels, editorials, popular songs and publications of different 
political movements will be used in an attempt to bring to the 
surface some of the basic philosophical positions at work in 
present day thought. Majors from different disciplines will be 
especially helpful in this undertaking. 

Phil 325 Plato— Aristotle (3) 
Offered 1971-1972. 

Phil 326 Augustine — Thomas (3) 
Through a reading of some of their major work and class dis- 
cussion an approach is made to an understanding of the 
nature, aims and challenges of these philosophers. The study 



of their works will be geared to increasing our understanding 
of their contributions to philosophical inquiry, their place and 
influence in the history of Western thought and the importance 
of their insights for man in his search for meaning. 

Offered 1971-1972. 

Phil 371 The French Spiritualistic School (3) 
The reaction of French philosophers to the positivism of 
Condillac, Comte and Spencer. The spiritualism of Pascal, 
Maine de Biran and Lachelier. The spiritual positivism of 
Ravaisson, Boutroux, Bergson and Teilhard de Chardin. Berg- 
son's theory of creative evolution and Teilhard's evolutionary 
world view from cosmogenesis to christogenesis will be em- 
phasized. 

Offered 1971-1972. 

Phil 372 Existentialism: theistic and atheistic (3) 
An analysis of the works of Soeren Kierkegaard who thought 
that man can reach an authentic existence only through a 
"god-relationship" and of the philosophy and plays of Jean- 
Paul Sartre who has consistently tried to show that man can 
discover his proper grandeur only if God does not exist. 

Phil 401 Philosophy Seminar: Minds, Machines, and Pur- 
posive Behavior (3) 
A philosophical study of the comparative behavior of minds 
and machines with special reference to the concepts of pur- 
pose and intentional action. Determinism and freedom; goal- 
directed behavior, purposivism, and behaviorism. 

Phil 410 Mathematical Logic (3) 
Completeness proof of quantification theory. Existence and 
singular inference; identity; descriptions. Number axioms and 
informal proofs. Classes and axiomatic set theory. Relations 
and functions. Variant theories of classes and ultimate 
classes. Mathematical induction. Analysis of foundations of 
mathematics: formalism, intuitionism, logicism. Paradoxes: 
Russell's; Grelling; Skolem; Burali-Forti. Theory of Types and 
possible solutions of paradoxes. Modal logic and necessity. 
Introduction to many-valued logics. Applications and theory 
of logic. 

Prerequisite: Phil 307 or the consent of the instructor. 

Phil 451-452 Contemporary Problems Seminar (3, 3) 
This seminar will be given by professors from the History, 
Art, English, and Philosophy Departments. Its purpose is to 
enable the students and the professors involved in it to dis- 
cuss together in depth and in breadth challenging contempo- 
rary problems common to the four disciplines, such as the 



24 



person and the community, permanence and change; respon- 
sibility and creativity. The seminar will focus on one central 
problem each year. The selected problem for 1970-1971 is that 
of the person and the community. 

Phil 497-498 Independent Study in Philosophy (0-3, 0-3) 
The student who wishes to take one or two semesters of 
Independent Study will present a typewritten detailed descrip- 
tion of the course requirements as agreed to by the professor 
giving the course and as approved by a representative of the 
Dean's office. 

The student must successfully carry through the project as 
outlined. It is only if these conditions are satisfied that Inde- 
pendent Study will carry academic credit. 

Only one Independent Study course should be carried In 
any one semester. 

Political Science 

All students must plan their curriculum with the advice of the 
chairman or of a member of the staff designated by the chair- 
man. Majors must receive a grade of C or higher in both 
semesters of the pre-major course PS 221-222 Patterns of 
Political Thought, as well as in at least 10 semesters of upper 
division units in Political Science. They should also submit 
an acceptable Senior project. 

PS 102 The Political Man (3) 
An inquiry into the political dimensions, structures and viable 
alternatives in the contemporary world. 

Offered every year. 

PS 203 Pro-Seminar in the United Nations (3) 
A study of current issues before the main organs of the United 
Nations involving the preparation of draft resolutions for pre- 
sentation to the National Model United Nations. Students will 
serve as delegates from a selected country to the NMUN. 

Offered every year. The course is given throughout two 
semesters but credit is given only at the end of the second 
semester. 

PS 221-222 Patterns of Political Thought (3, 3) 
An exploration of the genesis of significant political ideas 
and thought-patterns operative now and incorporated in the 
socio-political, intellectual and ideological structures and 
processes. 

Offered every year. 



PS 301-302 American Government (3, 3) 

First semester devoted to the Federal system with attention 
directed to the Constitution, civil rights, the presidency, Con- 
gress and the federal judiciary. Second semester concerns 
the state and local areas with attention directed to the state 
constitutions, governorship, legislature; rural local govern- 
ment, the county and its traditional offices, state courts and 
municipal governments; the rising challenge of the metro- 
politan problems. 

Offered every year. 

PS 303 International Law and Organization (3) 
Theory and practice of international law; sources and sub- 
jects of international law; the law of the sea; air and outer 
space law; ways of settling disputes among states; the indi- 
vidual and international law; legal aspects of international 
political conflicts; the United Nations and international law. 

Offered every year. 

PS 303-306 American Political Thought (3, 3) 
Selected problems in American Political Thought to be ex- 
plored intensively. 

Offered 1971-1972. 

PS 307-308 International Relations: 1943 to Present 

(3,3) 
Analysis of world politics from bi-polarism to polycentrism; 
structures and dynamics of state interaction; the politics of 
international organizations; processes of international inte- 
gration; approaches to problems of security and world order; 
major contemporary issues in international relations. 

Offered every year. 

PS 309 American Political Parties (3) 
Nature and purpose of political parties; the history of major 
and minor political parties; party leadership and techniques; 
the suffrage. A reading-discussion course. 

PS 312 State and Local Government in the United States 

(3) 
State constitutions, fiscal practice, taxation, budgeting, gov- 
ernorship, electoral laws, legislature, judiciaries, city, county 
and town administrations; the problems of metropolitan areas. 

PS 315,316 Public Administration (3) 
Basic concepts and organization principles of bureaucracy; 
the place of administration and the role of administrators in 
the American system of government; patronage and merit; 
career service and political executives; pressure groups. The 
process of social, economic and financial decision-making; 



25 



the interaction of institutions, ideas and power in decisions 
concerning economic planning, fiscal policies and related 
policy areas. PS 316 is equivalent to PS 315 but is given in 
tfie second semester. 

PS 318 Civil Rights and Civil Liberties in America (3) 
An historical and analytical review/ of the development of 
human rights in the American legal system. Selected topics 
will be considered: (1) freedom of religion, (2) censorship and 
privacy, (3) freedom of speech, (4) national security and 
loyalty, (5) the right to vote, (6) racial discrimination. Cases 
reviewed will range from traditional constitutional dogma to 
the legal frontiers suggested by litigation involving Martin 
Luther King, Pete Seeger, Timothy Leary, and Benjamin 
Spock. 

PS 322 Political Sociology (3) 
An inquiry into selected areas of Political Sociology; repre- 
sentative theorists; the physical and social frameworks of 
politics; sources of political antagonisms; political strategies; 
the processes of political integration; public opinion and 
propaganda. 

Offered every year. 

PS 323-324 Comparative Politics (3, 3) 
A comparative analysis of political patterns and systems 
selected from the West European, Soviet and Asian areas: 
France, Great Britain, West Germany and the USSR; Japan, 
India and China. Major issues in the politics of the countries 
considered. 

Offered every year. 

PS 331 Russian Revolutionary Tradition (3) 
History of Russian revolutionary movement from the Decem- 
brist revolt in the first quarter of the 19th century to Trotsky- 
Stalin controversy in the 1920's. Survey of ideologies of Ni- 
hilism, Populism, Terrorism, Menshevism and Bolshevism. In- 
tensive study of the socio-political and ideological roots of 
Leninism and Stalinism. 

PS 332 Political Thought from Lenin to Brezhnev (3) 
Intensive examination of the political ideas of the leaders of 
the Soviet Union from its origins in 1917 to the present. Study 
of the interaction between the Communist program of action 
and the Soviet domestic and foreign policies. 

PS 451 Dissent and Revolution (3) 
An inquiry into the foundations, structures and projected con- 
sequences of political activism. 



PS 352 Political Anthropology (3) 

A critical comparative analysis of the Lockean, Hegelian, and 
Marxian notions of man, their bearings on political reality 
and political programs, their confrontation with Christian 
commitment. 

PS 361-362 Urban Practicum (3,3) 
Involvement in an urban office or agency, governmental or 
private, to study in the broadest sense some aspect of an 
urban problem under the direction of the Archdiocesan Plan- 
ning Office. Enrollment in the course, type of work, hours and 
place, to be arranged with the instructor. 

PS 366 Race Relations in America (2) 
Analysis of the political, social, cultural and economic factors 
underlying contemporary race relations and an examination 
of the attempts to resolve racial problems. 

Offered 1971-72. 

PS 373 Political Imagination 
An inquiry into the origins of the contemporary socio-political 
crises with special attention to the impact of political aspira- 
tions as expressed in literature. 

Offered 1971-72. 

PS 374 Politics of Hope (3) 
A problematic exploration of the Christian condition in the 
contemporary world with an introduction to Emmanuel Mou- 
nier, Ernst Bloch, H. Marcuse, Gandhi and Mao Tse-tung. 

Offered 1971-72. 

PS 451 Political Theory Seminar 
A study in depth of major trends in contemporary Political 
Science, their empirical and theoretical foundations and 
methods. 

Offered every year. 

PS 497-498 Independent Study in Political Science (0-3, 

0-3) 
The student who wishes to take one or two semesters of 
Independent Study will present a typewritten detailed descrip- 
tion of the course requirements as agreed to by the professor 
giving the course and as approved by a representative of the 
Dean's office. 

The student must successfully carry through the project as 
outlined. It is only if these conditions are satisfied that Inde- 
pendent Study will carry academic credit. 

Only one Independent Study course should be carried in 
any one semester. 



26 



His 373-374 American Constitutional Development (3, 3) 

See History section for description. 

His 375-376 American Foreign Policy (3, 3) 
See History section for description. 

Ec 351-352 Comparative Systems (3, 3) 
See Economics section for description. 

Soc 320 Urban Sociology (3) 
See Sociology for description. 

Psychology 

REQUIREMENTS FOR MAJORS: 
Psy 171 and any Mathematics course on the college level in 
the Freshman year (Math 107-108, Math 105-106, and Math 
109-110 are recommended in that order); Psy 202 and Psy 204 
in Sophomore year; Psy 351 and Psy 463-464 in Junior year; 
Psy 499 in Senior year. Psy 202 is a prerequisite for all 
courses over 300. A minimum of eight upper-division courses 
must be completed with a grade of C or better. The remaining 
required upper-division courses may be chosen from the 
courses offered in the Department numbered above 300, or 
Phil 301-302. Other requirements: a satisfactory thesis or 
project in the area of the individual student's choice. The 
Graduate Record Examination in Psychology taken In the 
Junior or Senior year Is recommended, particularly for the 
students planning graduate work in Psychology. In addition 
to Experimental Psychology, students are urged to take an 
additional laboratory elective. 

Psy 171,172 Human Anatomy (3) 
A study of all the systems of man including both gross and 
microscopic anatomy. Psy 172 Is equivalent to Psy 171 but Is 
given In the second semester. 

Psy 201 General Psychology (3) 
A beginning course in psychology for non-psychology majors. 
Emphasis will be placed on the chief problems of psychology 
and their practical applications. 

Psy 202 introduction to Psychology (3) 
A study of the chief problems of psychology and an Introduc- 
tion to methods of research. 

Psy 204 Statistics in Psychology (3) 
An introduction to statistical terms and concepts; measures of 
central tendency, variability, and relationship; theory of sam- 
pling; reliability of statistical measures; regression and pre- 
diction. No late registrants will be accepted in this course. 



Psy 302 Physiological Psychology (3) 

A study of the effect of the systems of the body on the per- 
sonality with major emphasis on the nervous system. This 
course presupposes a knowledge of human anatomy. 

Psy 303 Abnormal Psychology (2) 
An introductory survey of mental and emotional disorders, 
illustrated with case histories. 

Psy 322 History and Systems of Psychology (3) 
A study of the development of psychology from its origins In 
philosophy, the biological sciences and sociology to its pres- 
ent forms. Emphasis on main problems, solved and yet un- 
solved, which have characterized the discipline. 

Psy 324 Developmental Psychology (3) 
Study of the emotional, moral, intellectual and social prob- 
lems of each age from childhood through old age in the light 
of various theories of human development, especially those 
of Erikson, Piaget, Allport. 

Psy 331 Social Psychology and Group Dynamics (3) 
The study of interaction, especially as it occurs in small 
groups. Attention to theoretical formulations and empirical 
findings concerning human and infra-human interaction. Ex- 
ploration of how social psychological techniques may help us 
understand some aspects of the relationships between na- 
tions. 

Psy 341 Depth Psychology (3) 
Readings and discussion of the works of Freud, Adier, Jung, 
Horney, Sullivan, Fromm and the existential psychologists 
with emphasis on their theories of religion, creativity, and 
society. 

Psy 350 Industrial Psychology (3) 
Emphasis will be placed on the theoretical and social founda- 
tions of industrial psychology. Topic areas considered will 
include: decision making; organizational behavior; human re- 
lations and management problems; principles of human per- 
formance. 

Psy 351 Theories of Personality (3) 
A consideration of the major personality theories. Attention 
is given to their utility In understanding normal personality. 

Psy 352 Psychological Testing (3) 
A survey of the major objective and projective psychological 
tests. Attention Is given to test construction, test reliability 
and validity. 



27 



Psy 362 Learning Theory and Cognitive Process (3) 

A study of theoretical and empirical bases for understanding 
the learning process, and an exploration of the development 
and forms of cognitive process. Attention is given to language 
acquisition, curiosity, creativity and related phenomena. 

Not offered in 1970-71. 

Psy 410 Culture and Personality (3) 
Consideration of the complex inter-relationships between so- 
cial and personal determinants of behavior. Special emphasis 
on the relationship betv^reen rapid socio-cultural transitions 
and socialization. 

Prerequisite: Psy 331 or Psy 351. 

Psy 450 Theories of the Self in Psychology and Phi- 
losophy (3) 
An inquiry into the development of the idea of the self as seen 
by philosophers and psychologists from Descartes to the 
present day. 

Psy 451 Psychological Aspects of Religion and Morality 

(3) 
A study of the interrelationship of moral and religious values 
as these affect the development of personality. An attempt 
will be made to distinguish and assess the contributions (1) 
of religious ethics and (2) of moral and developmental psy- 
chology to the study of morality. 

Psy 453 Psychology of Women (3) 
Students do independent research on psychological aspects 
of woman in relation to contemporary society. 

Psy 455-456 Clinical Procedures (3, 3) 
A year-long course offering one or two afternoons of field 
work with adults or children. The lectures and discussion will 
emphasize diagnostic and therapeutic processes, different 
theories of therapy, and an evaluation of their effectiveness. 
Students must enroll for both semesters. No credit will be 
given for one semester. 

Prerequisite: Psy 303. 

Psy 460 Mental Retardation (2) 
The etiology, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of mental 
retardation will be discussed and illustrated through case 
material. 

Psy 461 Emotional Disturbance in Childhood (2) 
Diagnosis, treatment and prevention of emotional problems in 
children will be investigated in the context of normal child 
development. Case material will be used to illustrate the 
various disorders. 



Prerequisite: Psy 303. Exceptions will be made on the ap- 
proval of the instructor. 

Psy 463-464 Experimental Psychology (3, 3) 
Basic concepts and development of experimental psychology. 
Introduction to experimental methods and writing research 
reports. Laboratory experiments in sensorimotor reactions, 
reaction time, association and learning processes, work and 
fatigue curve, emotional reactions, and social behavior. 

Psy 465 Comparative Psychology (3) 
An introductory laboratory course in the psychology of animal 
behavior. Major topic areas will include: Why study animal 
behavior?; methodological considerations in animal research; 
sensory processes; instinct theory; experience and develop- 
ment of behavior. 

Psy 497-498 Independent Study in Psychology (0-3, 0-3) 
Selected upperclassmen will be allowed to do research on 
projects under qualified psychologists in the Boston area. 

The student who wishes to take one or two semesters of 
Independent Study will present a typewritten detailed descrip- 
tion of the course requirements as agreed to by the professor 
giving the course and as approved by a representative of the 
Dean's office. 

The student must successfully carry through the project as 
outlined. It is only if these conditions are satisfied that Inde- 
pendent Study will carry academic credit. 

Only one Independent Study course should be carried in 
any one semester. 

Psy 499 Senior Project (3) 
Presentation of research done on one problem in Psychology 
to the Department for evaluation. Project may be completed 
in either the fall or spring semester. 

Religion 

TYPES OF COURSES 
The Department of Religion offers courses of three types: 
Introductory or Auxiliary, General, and Advanced. 

Rel 100 Introductory or Auxiliary Courses are intended to 
impart an appreciation for the study of religion or else a re- 
ligious interpretation of certain basic human issues, especially 
to students who do not expect to engage in the systematic 
study of religion. 

Rel 200 General Courses are designed to provide a sys- 
tematic grounding in religious thought, particularly to students 



28 



who are interested in mal<ing religion a major or a minor 
study. 

Rel 300 Advanced Courses are intended to offer an initia- 
tion into the practice of scientific method in religious thought, 
primarily to majors but also to otherwise qualified students. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MAJOR IN RELIGION: 

1. Ten courses, no more than two of which may be on the 
Introductory or Auxiliary level, and at least four of which 
must be on the Advanced level. On the General level, the 
student must take at least one course in three different 
functional specialties; on the Advanced level, no more 
than three courses in any functional specialty. With the 
approval of the chairman of the department, a student may 
substitute two courses in other fields for requirements on 
the Introductory or Auxiliary and the General levels. 

2. A modern language (preferably French or German) or a 
Biblical language (Hebrew or Greek). This requirement 
must be satisfied by the end of the Junior year. 

3. Participation in a Senior Honors Seminar conducted by all 
the members of the department and completion of a Senior 
project approved by the department. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A MINOR IN RELIGION: 

1. Five courses, no more than one of which may be on the 
Introductory or Auxiliary level, and at least two of which 
must be on the Advanced level. With the approval of the 
chairman a student may substitute one course in another 
department for a course on the Introductory or Auxiliary or 
the General level. 

2. Optional participation in the Senior Honors Seminar. 

Rel 111 Introduction to the Bible (3) 

A survey of the biblical literature (Old and New Testaments). 
Introduction to the various presuppositions and methodolo- 
gies of biblical study. Some explication of major biblical 
themes — e.g., God, man, election, salvation, etc. 

Rel 121 The Current Crisis in Religion (3) 
A study of the principal formative factors causing the current 
crisis of modernization and the effect of this crisis on the 
Catholic Church especially in terms of the development of its 
self-understanding as church and the renewal of its concept 
and exercise of authority. 

Rel 123 The Religious Revolution (3) 
A study of (1) the roots of the modern crisis of belief, (2) the 
consequences of this crisis in the making of a counter-culture 



and the turn to radical politics, (3) the reaction of American 
college students to the crisis. 

Rel 126 The Crisis of Belief in the Church (3) 
A study of (1) the power-struggle in the Catholic Church, (2) 
the relationship of the Catholic Church to other Christian 
churches and of Christianity to other religions, and (3) the 
mission of the Church to the modern world. 

Rel 129 Religion in America (3) 
Against the background of current attitudes which may be 
called characteristically American, the transcendental nature 
and critical role of religion will be examined. Of particular 
interest will be the exploration of the relationship between 
the modern development of "secular culture" and its interpre- 
tation and evaluation by such recent American Theologians 
as the Niehburs, Tillich, Marty, Merton, etc. 

Offered in 1971-1972. 

Rel 132 The Contemporary Problem of Theism (3) 
An analysis of the contemporary problems associated with 
the question of theism: the reality of God, our knowledge of 
God, the use of the term "God" and the complexities behind 
the phenomenon of contemporary atheism and agnosticism. 

Offered in 1971-1972. 

Rel 141 Religion and Morality (3) 
A study of the interrelationship of moral and religious values 
as these affect the development of personality. An attempt 
will be made to distinguish and assess the contributions (1) 
of religious ethics and (2) of moral and developmental psy- 
chology to the study of morality. 

Rel 143 Christian Marriage (3) 
A study of the principal contemporary areas of concern in 
Christian marriage including human sexuality and human and 
Christian love, preparation for marriage. Catholic and ecu- 
menical marriages, marriage and the reform of canon law, 
responsible parenthood and birth control and the possibility 
of second marriages. 

Rel 151 Introduction to Religions (3) 
An introduction to the basic methods and thematic issues 
involved in the study of religion. Some of the fundamental 
areas as religion and its experience (including nature and 
revelation, the sacred and the profane and God in immanence 
and transcendence) and man as religious being (including 
man in the world, man in community and man in history) will 
be explored. 

Offered in 1971-1972. 



29 



Rel 211 Biblical Archaeology and the History of Israel 

(3) 
History and methodology of Palestinian excavations including 
a concentrated study of several archaeological sites. Analysis 
of the contributions of archaeological research to a more 
accurate understanding of the history of Israel within the 
broader context of the history of the ancient Near East. 

Rel 212 Biblical Biographies: Studies of Selected Old and 

New Testament Personalities (3) 
A depth study of specific biblical personalities (male and 
female) e.g., Moses, David, Ruth, Bathsheba, Ezekiel; atten- 
tion given to the milieu out of which each personality arose; 
an attempt to discern the meaning of these personalities for 
our understanding of modern man. 

Rel 213 Old Testament Prophets and Modern Social Prob- 
lems (3) 
The prophets as a major influence in the historical and theo- 
logical development of the people of Israel. The phenomenon 
of prophetism and its development will be studied in detail. 
Particular emphasis on the relevance of the prophetic ideal 
to the modern world including an attempt to define modern 
prophets. 

Offered in 1971-1972. 

Rel 214 Modern Judaism (3) 
Consideration of the historical process by which modern 
Judaism emerged, including a study of Jewish festivals; study 
of major theological tenets in modern Judaism; some consid- 
eration will be given to the theological bases for Jewish- 
Christian dialogue. 

Rel 2io Biblical Theology (3) 

Careful examination of recent attempts to formulate a biblical 
theology. Detailed study of major biblical theological motifs. 
Opportunity for individual study of particular themes which 
are of interest to the student. 

Offered in 1971-1972. 

Rel 218 Wisdom Literature (3) 
Hebrew wisdom as expressed in Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and 
Job. The place of the wisdom tradition in Israel as compared 
to the priestly and prophetic traditions. Comparison of Israel's 
wisdom tradition with that of other ancient Near Eastern cul- 
tures. Extensive exposition of the problem of evil as illus- 
trated in the book of Job. 

Offered in 1971-1972. 



Rel 221 The Synods of Bishops (I, II) (3) 

A study of the first and second synods of bishops as a simul- 
taneous living expression of, and definitional search for the 
notion of ecclesial collegiality. 

Rel 222 The Development of Christian Doctrine (3) 
An analysis of the development in the dogma and the the- 
ology of Christ and the Trinity from the post-Apostolic era to 
the Reformation. 

Rel 224 Vatican II (3) 
A concise historical investigation of the principal themes and 
areas of concern in the four sessions of Vatican II as reflect- 
ing the church's self understanding in an age of renewal. 

Rel 226 The World Council of Churches (3) 
A concise historical study of the "fellowship of churches 
which accept our Lord Jesus Christ as God and Saviour" 
from the fashion of the two earlier movements "Life and 
Work" (Oxford) and "Faith and Order" (Edinburgh) to the 
fourth assembly of the World Council of Churches (Uppsala, 
1968). The course is intended to supply the student with an 
appreciation of the problems and the efforts for the achieve- 
ment of Christian unity by the Protestant and Orthodox 
Churches. 

Rel 231 Theological Anthropology (3) 
The Christian understanding of God and Man will be explored 
on the basis of the traditional doctrines of the Church. Par- 
ticular attention will be paid to the starting-point of this 
understanding and the manner of its interpretation as already 
arising from the commitment of a Christian community. 

Rel 232 Contemporary Theism (3) 
Various directions from among twentieth century theologians, 
both American and European, will be followed in order to 
ascertain the present status of the perennial "God-Question". 
Special emphasis will be placed on the notions of God as 
'ground of being', 'transcendence in immanence', and 'the 
future of man'. 

Rel 233 Christian Belief in God (3) 

(1) An investigation into the origin of the Christian belief in 
God in the history of Israel, the message and the person of 
Jesus Christ, and the mission of the Spirit to the Church and 

(2) an assessment of that belief in the context of modern 
atheism and secularism. 

Prerequisite: Introduction to the Old and the New Testa- 
ment. 



30 



Rel 234 Existential Theology (3) 

On the basis of a preliminary consideration of man's existen- 
tial possibilities a study will be undertaken to determine how 
the Christian message relates to these possibilities and how 
these in turn are "in-formed" by the life of Faith and au- 
thentic Christian existence. The contributions made by the 
recent personalist and pragmatic movements will be stressed. 

Rel 235 Aesthetic Aspects of Theology (3) 
A study of the "splendor" of Catholic Theology will be ex- 
plored in the light of the third transcendental, the beautiful. 
Historical demonstration, taken primarily from modern laity, 
e.g.; Pascal, Mozart, Greco, Eliot, Schoenberg, Peguy, Rouauit, 
etc., will make "apparent" the intimate relation between per- 
ception of "justesse" of Catholic theology and being seized 
by its beauty. 

Offered in 1971-1972. 

Rel 236 The Problem of God Today (3) 
A study of the modern and contemporary challenges to the 
proofs for God's existence (rationalism and analysis), to the 
knowledge of God (agnosticism), to the existence of God 
(atheism), and to the possibility of God (secularism). 

Offered in 1971-1972. 

Rel 238 The Meaning of Jesus Christ for World History 

(3) 
An interpretation of the significance of Jesus Christ for Jew- 
ish tvlessianism, Pauline and Joannine Christology, the growth 
and development of Christianity, and the history of religion. 

Offered in 1971-1972. 

Rel 242 Religion and Ethics (3) 
Introduction to the aims and methods of moral discourse with 
special attention given to the role of religious categories in 
the formation of ethical positions. The course will study such 
issues as natural law theory, contextual ethics, current prob- 
lems in the renewal of Christian moral philosophy. 

Rel 244 Social Ethics and Radical Criticism of Society 

(3) 
A consideration of some of the normative and analytical prob- 
lems involved in radical critiques of institutions, especially 
contemporary criticism of American society. Special attention 
will be paid to those psychological and sociological condi- 
tions which produce "dissenting individuals" in society. The 
role of religious values and institutions as either revolutionary 
or counter-revolutionary forces will be considered. Readings in 
Goodman, Marcuse, Walzer, Cox, lllich, Metz, etc. 

Offered in 1971-1972. 



Rel 261 Philosophical Theology I (3) 

"Reason and Religion"; an examination of the relationship 
between metaphysics and theology from Kant to Jaspers will 
trace the ineluctable transition of religious concern from a 
speculative inquiry to an existential involvement. While the 
course will consist substantially of lecture material, students 
should be prepared to discuss with some perception insights 
gained from readings in the key works of Kant, Nietzsche, 
Jaspers, etc. (See Rel 262) 

Offered in 1971-1972. 

Rel 262 Philosophical Theology II (3) 
"Natural Theology" a continuation of the examination of the 
relationship between metaphysics and theology will concen- 
trate on the renewal of interest in ontology from Heidegger 
to the present. Special emphasis will be placed on the theme 
"Hearer of the Word", and again readings from the key works 
of such writers as Heidegger, Blondel, Rahner, etc., will be 
expected. (See Rel 261) 

Offered in 1971-1972. 

Rel 263 Authentic Christian Existence (3) 
An initiation to the process of self-meaning as the condition 
for faith in God and belief in Christ. 

Offered in 1971-1972. 

Rel 264 Fundamental Theology and Human Experience 

(3) 
Within a frame of reference of borderline questions on the 
frontiers of theology which deal with the very foundations of 
a deeper understanding and a more effective proclamation of 
our faith in its confrontation with contemporary philosophical 
and theological problems, the course is designed to raise the 
question and give some tentative answers to the problem of 
how fundamental theology can start from human experience. 

Rel 311 Seminar: Mythology in the Old Testament and in 

Related Literatures of the Ancient Near East (3) 
An attempt to discern the function of myth in the religious 
life of a people. Examination of various Semitic myths — e.g., 
the creation epic, the flood, the fall, etc. Analysis of the 
unique contribution of the Israelites to mythic literature. 

Rel 312 New Testament Studies (3) 
Seminar on the Synoptic Gospels with particular emphasis on 
the problem of the historical Jesus. 

Rel 313 Seminar: Advanced Biblical Hebrew (3) 
Exegesis in selected portions of the prophetic literature and 
the Qumran literature. Also includes practice in rapid reading 
and translation of the biblical texts. 



31 



Rel 314 The Church and Modern Biblical Interpretation 

(3) 
Careful examination of various liistorlcal attitudes of the 
Christian Church toward critical biblical studies. Major con- 
sideration throughout the course on various ways to interpret 
the biblical message to the present age. 

Offered in 1971-1972. 

Rel 315 The Dead Sea Scrolls (3) 
An archaeological and theological study of the Essenes in- 
cluding: an historical assessment of sectarian Judaism dur- 
ing the inter-testamental period; a careful examination of 
archaeological evidence pertaining to the Essene community 
at Qumran; a depth study of the Dead Sea Scrolls with par- 
ticular emphasis on Essenic theology. 

Offered in 1971-1972. 

Rel 321 The History of Theology (3) 
A survey of approaches to God-talk in the Bible, in the Fa- 
thers and the Councils of the Church, in medieval scholasti- 
cism, in Reform and liberal Protestantism, and in linguistic 
analysis and phenomenological existentialism. 

Offered in 1971-1972. 

Rel 322 Some Documents of Vatican 11 (3) 
Seminar on the principal documents of Vatican II, such as 
constitutions on the church and the church in the modern 
world, the decree on ecumenism and the declaration on re- 
ligious liberty. 

Rel 323 The Orthodox Church (3) 
Seminar designed to respond to the decree on ecumenism 
which exhorts all Roman Catholics to come to a better under- 
standing of our separated brethren in Christ. The seminar 
will focus its attention on the principal religious beliefs and 
practices of the Greek and Russian Orthodox Churches. 

Offered in 1971-1972. 

Rel 324 Studies in American Religion (3) 
A study of the leading motifs and problems, both theological 
and social, faced by Protestantism, Catholicism, and Judaism 
in America. Attention will be paid to changing patterns of 
theological and historiographical scholarship as these have 
either lauded or deprecated the role of religion and the 
churches in American life. 

Offered in 1971-1972. 

Rel 331 Authority in the Church (3) 
Seminar in the nature and exercise of authority in the Church. 
The seminar is intended to show (1) that the political para- 



digms of authority (monarchical, democratic, authoritarian) 
which have been used do not apply to the Church and (2) 
that the Church is a unique society and hence its understand- 
ing and use of authority must also be unique. 

Offered In 1971-1972. 

Rel 341 Religion and Human Development (3) 
First part of a year-long seminar which will explore religious 
perspectives on some aspects of human identity and char- 
acter. The first semester will focus on psycho-social develop- 
ment, especially the role of faith or trust in the life cycle. 
Lectures, discussions, student reports, (cf Rel 342) Readings 
in Eliade, Freud, Erikson, H. R. Niebuhr, Tlllich, etc. 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

Rel 342 Ethics and Character (3) 
The second part of a year-long seminar which will explore 
religious perspectives on some aspects of human identity and 
character. This part of the course will consider the implica- 
tions for theological ethics of the processes by which char- 
acter and identity are formed. Lectures, discussions and 
student reports, (cf Rel 341) 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

Rel 343 Studies in Religion and Ethics (3) 
An analysis of some contemporary thinkers who are exploring 
the role of religious categories in ethical thought. Special 
attention this term will be given to the works of Paul Ricoeve. 

Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor. 

Offered In 1971-1972. 

Rel 345 Theology of Revolution (3) 
Seminar on (1) the meaning of "revolution" as it emerges 
from the history of revolution, (2) the morality of violence in 
revolution, and (3) the significance of revolution for the 
Christian. 

Rel 347 The Birth Control Debate (3) 
Seminar on the principal factors producing the debate and 
crisis on birth control including the reports of the birth con- 
trol commission, the encyclical "Humanae Vitae" and the re- 
sponses to it from the world, episcopate, the theologians and 
the rank-and-file members of the church. 

Rel 362 The Future of Christianity (3) 
A study of (1) Christian hope in light of various approaches 
to thinking about the future (prediction, prophecy, process, 
perspective) and (2) the contributions of Christianity to the 
future of man. 



32 



Rel 364 The Foundations of Theological Method (3) 

An essay in the tradition of Bernard Lonergan at establishing 
the bases for a science of theology in an empirical logic, an 
historical epistemology, a philosophical anthropology, and a 
transcendental ontology. 

Offered in 1971-1972. 

Rel 401-402 Senior Honors Seminar, 1970-1971: Theory 

and Practice in Religion (3) 
A study of the relation of faith to theology, of theology to 
ethics, of ethics to action, of individual action to social change. 

Rel 497-498 Independent Study in Religion (0-3, 0-3) 
The student who wishes to take one or two semesters of 
Independent Study will present a typewritten detailed descrip- 
tion of the course requirements as agreed to by the professor 
giving the course and as approved by a representative of the 
Dean's office. 

The student must successfully carry through the project as 
outlined. It is only if these conditions are satisfied that Inde- 
pendent Study will carry academic credit. 

Only one Independent Study course should be carried in 
any one semester. 

Division of Science 



BIOLOGY 
Freshman Year 

Sophomore Year 

Junior Year 

Senior Year 
*Any one of the 
elective: Bio 304, 



First Semester 
Bio 101 
Chem 101 
Physics 111 
Bio 301 
Chem 205 
Math 151 
Bio 303 
Bio 305 
Bio 409 



Second Semester 
Bio 102 
Chem 102 
Physics 112 
Bio 302 
Chem 206 
Math 152 
Bio 404 
Bio (elective*) 
Bio 410 



following courses may be selected as an 
Bio 306, Bio 307, Bio 406, Bio 408. 



Majors are to consult with the Director of Science for assign- 
ment to a permanent major advisor. 

Majors are required to complete a minimum of 23 credits 
with a grade of C or better beyond the Bio 101-102 level. 



Bio 101-102 Cell to Organism (4,4) 
Study of the patterns of organization through which molecules, 
organelles, cells and tissues give living organisms their basic 
properties. Fall semester: cell biology integrated with the ele- 
ments of biochemistry and cell physiology. Spring semester: 
principles of developmental biology, whereby the information 
from genetic material is translated Into form and function 
during the Individual life spans of plants and animals. Three 
lectures and one two-hour laboratory. 

Bio 301-302 Comparative Vertebrate Morphogenesis 

(4,4) 
A comparative morphological and embryological study of the 
vertebrates. Evolutionary changes in vertebrate structure from 
the protochordates through representative members of all the 
vertebrate classes will be studied. Emphasis will be placed 
on understanding the underlying principles behind these mor- 
phogenetic events. Two lectures and two two-hour labora- 
tories. 

Bio 303 General Genetics (3) 
The principles of genetics and their relation to fundamental 
biological problems. Discussion of the molecular basis of 
heredity, the nature, transmission and action of genetic mate- 
rial as derived from experimental work with higher plants, 
animals, and microorganisms. Two lectures and one two-hour 
laboratory. 

Bio 304 Topics in Advanced Genetics (3) 
This course is designed for students who have taken Bio 303 
and who wish to deepen their knowledge in some of the prob- 
lems of genetic research today. Each student will pursue an 
Independent study of a topic of her choice. She will then sub- 
mit a complete bibliography of the subject and present a 
paper for discussion by the whole class. 

Offered 1970-71. 

Bio 305 Histology (4) 
The microscopic anatomy of tissues as related to function. 
This will Include classical methods of study as well as modern 
research techniques. Three lectures and one two-hour lab- 
oratory. 

Bio 306 Advanced Histological Technique (4) 
A laboratory oriented course. Includes techniques used in 
investigation of problems in cell biology, photomicrography, 
tissue culture, phase contrast microscopy, cryobiology, histo- 
chemical enzyme studies, exfoliative cytology and autoradi- 
ography. 



33 



Bio 307 Experimental Biology (4) 

A laboratory oriented course concerned with selected basic 
methods, techniques, and instruments used in experimental 
biology. 

Bio 404 Biochemistry and Cellular Physiology (4) 
A biochemical and biophysical approach to the cell as the 
biological common denominator. Includes cell physiology of 
both plants and animals. 

Offered 1970-71. 

Bio 406 Vertebrate Physiology (3) 
A systematic approach to functions of organs and organ sys- 
tems in the vertebrates with special emphasis on regulatory 
mechanisms and reproductive physiology. 

Offered in 1972-73. 

Bio 408 Endocrinology (3) 
A review of the general and comparative aspects of endo- 
crinology. 

Offered in 1971-72. 

Bio 409-410 Senior Research (6) 
All students will present a senior paper on their research 
supervised by the staff. Seniors should consult with a faculty 
member concerning their senior thesis and submit an outline 
of the thesis to the department for approval by the third 
Thursday in October. The outline should give the objective 
and how that objective will be accomplished. The outline 
should be signed by the faculty advisor. The department will 
review the outline and recommend appropriate action. 

CHEMISTRY 

Freshman Year 

First Semester 
Calculus (Math 151) (4) 
Physics 101 (4) 
Chem 201 (3) (Class) 
Chem 203 (1) (Lab) 

Sophomore Year 

First Semester 
Calculus (Math 251) (4) 
Chem 301 
Chem 205 



Senior Year 

First Semester 
Chem 401 * 



Second Semester 
Chem 402* 



Junior Year 

First Semester 
Chem 305 
Chem 303 



Second Semester 
Calculus (Math 152) (4) 
Chem 202 (3) (Class) 
Chem 204 (1) (Lab) 
Physics 302 or 304 (4) (4) 

Second Semester 
Chem 302 

Physics (Spectroscopy 
elective) 

Second Semester 
Chem 306 
Chem 304 



*Will be part of the senior comprehensive evaluation experi- 
ence and offer some flexibility in the choice of topics. 

A grade of C or better is required for courses 300 and 
above. 

Chem 201 Introductory inorganic and Physical Chemistry 

(3) 
Study of the fundamental laws of chemistry, atomic and 
molecular structure, theory of bonding, state of matter. Three 
lectures. 

Prerequisite: Phy 101 and Math 115. 

Chem 202 Introductory Inorganic and Physical Chemistry 

(3) 
A continuation of Chem 201 with emphasis on introductory 
thermodynamics, acid-base theory, equilibrium and kinetics. 
Three lectures. 

Chem 203 Qualitative Analysis (1) 
One three-hour laboratory. Analysis of ions. 

Chem 204 Introductory Quantitative Analysis (1) 
One three-hour laboratory including acid-base titrations, pre- 
cipitation methods, complex reactions, and colori metric de- 
terminations. 

Chem 301 Physical Methods of Analysis (4) 
A study of some of the more common analytical procedures 
in modern chemistry such as chromatography, extraction pro- 
cedures, potentiometric and spectrometric methods. Two 
lectures and one four-hour laboratory. 

Chem 302 Introduction to Quantum and Radiochemistry 

(3) 
Introduction to the fundamentals of quantum chemistry. A 
study of the properties and reactions of the nucleus. The 
measurement of radiation and the effects of radiation on both 
inorganic and organic substances. 

Chem 303 Thermodynamics (4) 
A study of the three laws of thermodynamics and their appli- 
cations in relationship to the states of matter. 

Prerequisite: Math 251-252. 

Chem 304 Chemical Kinetics, Equilibrium, Electrochem- 
istry (4) 
A study of the rate of reactions, equilibrium state in ideal and 
non-ideal systems and principles of electrochemistry. Four 
lectures. 



34 



Chem 305-306 Physical Organic Chemistry (6, 6) 

Structure and mechanism of reactions, functional groups. Four 
lectures and one four-hour laboratory, including both synthe- 
sis and identification of compounds. Both qualitative and 
quantitative methods. Determinations of structure. 

Prerequisite: Chem 202. Co-requisite: Chem 303-304. 

Chem 401 Senior Seminar (3) 
This course is designed to acquaint the student with the sci- 
entific literature and teach her critical reading, experiment 
planning as well as scientific writing and presentation of 
papers. 

Chem 497-498 Independent Studies in Chemistry (0-3, 0-3) 
The student who wishes to take one or two semesters of 
Independent Study will present a typewritten detailed descrip- 
tion of the course requirements as agreed to by the professor 
giving the course and as approved by a representative of the 
Dean's office. 

The student must successfully carry through the project as 
outlined. It is only if these conditions are satisfied that Inde- 
pendent Study will carry academic credit. 

Only one Independent Study course should be carried in 
any one semester. 

The following courses are open to non-majors: 
Chem 101-102 Principles of Modern Chemistry (4,4) 

Theory of solutions, colloids, acids, bases and buffers, oxida- 
tion reduction, chemical kinetics and equilibrium as well as 
their applications to the various fields of science througn 
analytical methods. Three lectures and one two-hour labo- 
ratory. 

Chem 205 Introduction to Organic Chemistry (4) 

A study of the organic functional groups. (Lectures and lab- 
oratory) 
Chem 206 Organic Compounds of Biological Interest (4) 

The organic chemistry of amino acids, proteins, lipids, carbo- 
hydrates, drugs. (Lectures and laboratory) 

PHYSICS 

A student desiring to major In Physics should include the 
following courses in her plan of studies: Phy 301, Phy 302, 
Phy 303, and Phy 304, Chem 201, Chem 202, Chem 203, 
Chem 204, Math 111-112 or Iviath 115-116 and Math 251-252 
or Math 211-212. 

Phy 101 Basic Concepts in Physics (4) 
Selected topics in classical and quantum physics. The se- 
lected topics in classical physics include force, energy, mo- 



tion, wave motion, heat, electricity, magnetism, and light. The 
selected topics in quantum physics include quanta, the atom, 
and the nucleus. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory 
period per week. This course may be counted towards filling 
the science requirement. 

Phy 111, 112 Fundamental Laws of Physics (4, 4) 
Introduction to the topics in classical and quantum physics 
listed in Phy 101. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory 
period per week. This course is required for biology majors. 

Two of the following courses will be given the second se- 
mester; which courses will depend on the interest of the 
students. In general the laboratory will be given at Boston 
College through cross registration. 

Phy 301 Introduction to Atomic and Nuclear Physics (4) 
Atomic and nuclear structure, nuclear transformations, fission, 
fusion, elementary particles. Three lectures and one two-hour 
laboratory period per week. 

Prerequisite: Phy 101 or Phy 111, 112 or the equivalent. 

Prerequisite or Co-requisite: Math 111-112 or 115-116. 

Phy 302 Optics (4) 
Geometrical and physical optics theory and use of optical 
instruments. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory pe- 
riod per week. 

Prerequisite: Phy 101 or Phy 111, 112 or the equivalent. 

Prerequisite or Co-requisite: Math 111-112 or 115-116. 

Phy 303 Mechanics (4) 
Newtonian mechanics, rotational motion, wave motion. Three 
lectures and one two-hour laboratory period per week. 

Prerequisite: Phy 101 or Phy 111, 112 or the equivalent. 

Prerequisite or Co-requisite: Math 111-112 or 115-116. 

Phy 304 Electricity (4) 
Fundamental laws of electric and magnetic fields: electric 
circuits; principles of electronics: electrical measuring instru- 
ments. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory period per 
week. 

Prerequisite: Phy 101 or Phy 111, 112 or the equivalent. 

Prerequisite or Co-requisite: Math 111-112 or 115-116. 

Phy 402 Experimental Spectroscopy (4) 
Methods of spectroscopy, including study of instruments, 
emission and absorption spectra, applications of spectroscopy 
to astronomical, biological, chemical, and physical problems. 
Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory period per week. 

Prerequisite: Phy 302. 



35 



NON-MAJOR COURSE 

Science 101-102 Scientific Basis of Social Issues (4,4) 
Development of a core of basic biological concepts and a 
study of their application to current social problems. Lecture, 
discussion, laboratory and field work in local communities. 

PRE-MEDICAL AND PRE-DENTAL STUDIES 
The student should make out her program in her Freshman 
year with the advice of the Director of Science, and in accord- 
ance with the entrance requirements of the medical schools 
to which she intends to apply. 

SCIENCE EDUCATION 

The infusion into the public schools of novel and improved 
educational materials and patterns of learning generated by 
the curriculum reform programs of the past decade has de- 
pended in large measure on the retraining of teachers in 
service. It has become increasingly clear that to insure large- 
scale effective use of these new patterns and to minimize 
degradation in the manner of their employment, it is necessary 
to launch programs of corresponding new patterns of learning 
in the colleges which prepare future teachers. The need for 
such renovation of pre-service teacher education has now 
become a major endeavor at Newton College of the Sacred 
Heart. 

The major objective at Newton College will be to develop a 
science base of elementary and secondary education courses 
that will reflect the philosophy and style of learning that char- 
acterizes the products of the science course improvement 
programs. 

SCIENCE EDUCATION PROGRAMS 
Science Education at Newton College will consist of the fol- 
lowing three major areas: 

1. Training — Preservice, In-service and summer training pro- 
grams will be developed. The basic courses will deal with 
current methodology. 

2. Resource and In-Service Training Center — A collection of 
educational materials will be available from most of the 
major curriculum development groups. Instruction and 
practice opportunity in the use of ail materials will be 
provided. 

3. Developmental Center — For the on-going development of 
graded self-contained units in science. New educational 
packages will be tested in local schools. 



SCIENCE EDUCATION COURSES 

Sci Ed 401 Methods of Teaching the Biological, Chemical 

and Physical Sciences (4) 

Sci Ed 402 Methods of Teaching the Biological, Chemical 

and Physical Sciences (4) 

Sci Ed 406 Practice Teaching in the Sciences (4) 

Sociology 

Requirements for majors: Soc 101-102 (pre-major course) in 
Sophomore year; Soc 301-302, Soc 303 in Junior or Senior 
year; Soc 401-402. Senior year: Eight upper-division courses 
with grade of C or better; six courses must be taken from 
courses offered in the Sociology department and two courses 
may be chosen from courses offered in other departments 
listed below. 

Soc 101 Sociology I. (3) 

Sociological concepts. Society and Culture, Structure and 
function of groups. Social classes. Age and Sex groups. Col- 
lective Behavior. 

Soc 102 Sociology 11 (3) 
The Population Problem. Communities and Urbanization. In- 
heritance and Race. The Family. Mass communication media 
and censorship. Bureaucracy. War and Revolution. 
Soc 301 Macro-Sociological Theory: Change in Societies 
(3) 
Will consider various theoretical approaches to the under- 
standing of large-scale changes in societies, concentrating 
on those conceptions of change that have emerged from the 
context of the industrialization, bureaucratization and urbani- 
zation of the last two centuries. 

Soc 302 Micro-Sociological Theory: Perspectives on In- 
teraction (3) 
Will examine conceptions of interaction processes and out- 
line the challenge of these conceptions to key trends In 
modern sociological theory. 
Soc 303 Statistics (3) 
Statistical methods used in Sociology. Collection and pre- 
sentation of data measures of central value and dispersion. 
Probability, the normal curve, statistical inference. Regression 
and correlation of quantitative and qualitative data. Tech- 
niques in social research. 



36 



Soc 310 The American Society (4) 

Will consider various sociological analyses of the develop- 
ment and direction of American Society since 1800, concen- 
trating particularly on current radical critiques and reinterpre- 
tations of various facets of American life. 

Soc 320 Urban Sociology (3) 
Will examine the rise of cities in both pre-industrial and In- 
dustrial societies, analyzing key hypotheses about the socio- 
logical concomitants of urbanization and considering some 
pressing problems of American cities. 

Soc 321 Sociology of Deviance and Control (3) 
Will focus on the characteristics and outcomes of the process 
of deviance and the reciprocal process of control in a number 
of social and political contexts. The various theories devel- 
oped to account for rates and types of deviance in such 
contexts will be surveyed and evaluated, and the importance 
of such theories to contemporary sociology will be considered. 

Soc 324 Sociology of the Family (3) 
Internal dynamism of the family and the relationship of the 
family to society. 

Soc 332 Anthropology (3) 
An introduction to a study of primitive man and the origins of 
civilization, folkways and institutions of primitive people. 

Offered 1971-72 and alternating years. 

Soc 334 Human Geography (3 
The purpose of the course is to give an understanding of 
reciprocal nature of man and his environment. Review of 
physical geography, the types and distribution of climates, 
and natural resources to which man adapts his economic and 
social life. 

Soc 335 Contemporary Social Movements (3) 
The basic nature of social movements as the solutions of 
collective problems will be examined. Careers of members, 
determinants and motives to join will be explored. Social 
movements will be viewed as responses to current social and 
political issues. 

Offered 1970-71 and alternating years. 

Soc 337 Sociology of Religion (3) 
Structural functional analysis of religious ideas. 

Offered 1971-72 and alternate years. 

Soc 341 Sociology of Technology (3) 
Will focus on the role of technology in societies both extinct 
and extant, emphasizing particularly the social effects of tech- 
nological changes during and since the industrial revolution. 

Offered 1970-71 and alternate years. 



Soc 343 Sociology of Occupations and Organizations (3) 

Will consider the interrelations and historical transformations 
of occupations and organizations, concentrating particularly 
on the causes and consequences of the differentiation of 
occupations and the development of large-scale bureaucracies 
in industrial societies. 

Offered 1971-72 and alternating years. 

Soc 401 Seminar on Theory and Research in Sociology 

(3) 
Will evaluate various methods of data collection and theory 
construction, emphasizing techniques of designing research 
addressed to significant intellectual problems and codified by 
emergent theories. Will provide time for the pursuit and a 
forum for the development of a modest research project on 
a topic selected by the student. 

Soc 402 Senior Project Seminar (2) 

Will oversee and accredit the senior project. Students may 
either initiate their own projects or participate in the depart- 
mentally designed project. 

Soc 497-498 Independent Study in Sociology (0-3, 0-3) 
Intended for Juniors wishing to undertake an accredited proj- 
ect involving independent research. The instructor will offer 
whatever advice and aid that he can, but will not formally 
teach. Enrollment during the second semester is not depend- 
ent on participation during the first semester. 

The student who wishes to take one or two semesters of 
Independent Study will present a typewritten detailed descrip- 
tion of the course requirements as agreed to by the professor 
giving the course and as approved by a representative of the 
Dean's office. 

The student must successfully carry through the project as 
outlined. It is only if these conditions are satisfied that Inde- 
pendent Study will carry academic credit. 

Only one Independent Study course should be carried in 
any one semester. 

Courses offered in other departments of which two courses 
chosen will count as upper-division courses for Sociology 
majors: 

Ec 351-352 Comparative Systems (3,3) 
Ec 367 Labor Economics and Problems (3) 

His 377-378 Political History of 20th Century United 
States 1900-Present (3,3) 



37 



His 382 Black Man in American History (3) 

PS 322 Political Sociology (3) 

PS 351 Dissent and Revolution (3) 

PS 361-362 Urban Practicum (3, 3) 

Psy 331 Social Psychology (3) 

Psy 410 Culture and Personality (3) 

Psy 34Q Developmental Psychology 



Fees and Expenses 



The costs to the student for a year at Newton College are 
explained below. 

Tuition, Room and Board 

TUITION: 

For the 1970-1971 academic year tuition will be $950 per 
semester. This charge includes the Student Activity Fee and 
the Student Health Insurance fee. 

ROOM AND BOARD CHARGE: 

The room and board charge for the 1970-1971 academic year 

will be $650 per semester. 

EXTRA REGISTRATION FEE: 

An additional tuition fee of $50 is charged for each semester 
hour above the normal schedule of sixteen hours. This addi- 
tional tuition fee does not apply to the classes graduating in 
1971 or 1972. 



38 



TUITION FOR PART-TIME STUDENTS: 
Part-time students may enroll for a maximum of eight semester 
hours. The tuition fee for such students will be $50 per 
semester hour. 



SUMMARY: 

Tuition for the academic year 

Room and board for the academic year 



Total 



$1900 
$1300 

$3200 



Other Fees 



APPLICATION FEE: 

A fee of $15 is charged for initial application to the College. 

This is non-refundable. 

LATE REGISTRATION OR CHANGE OF SCHEDULE: 

There Is a $10 charge for registering after Registration Day or 

for dropping or adding a course after the deadline. 

LATE RESERVATION DEPOSIT: 

There is a $10 penalty charge for paying the Reservation 

Deposit after the deadline. 

PARKING PERMIT FOR RESIDENT STUDENTS: 
$25 per year, applicable to all resident students having auto- 
mobiles on campus. 

PARKING PERMIT FOR COMMUTING STUDENTS: 
$15 per year, applicable to all commuting students having 
automobiles on campus. 



Reservation Deposit 



ENTERING STUDENTS: 

A candidate for admission is charged a fee of $15 for initial 
application. Upon notification that she has been admitted to 
Newton College, the candidate must return with her accept- 
ance a Reservation Deposit of $200 which will be credited in 
full to her tuition bill for the first semester. The Reservation 
Deposit is non-refundable after the due date except to a stu- 
dent whose academic record at the end of her senior year in 
high school proves unsatisfactory. 

CURRENTLY ENROLLED STUDENTS: 

Students currently enrolled at the College who wish to reserve 

a place for the next academic year must submit a $200 Reser- 



vation Deposit by April 15. This deposit, which is credited in 
full to her tuition bill for the next semester, is non-refundable 
after the due date except to a student whose academic record 
is unsatisfactory. 

Studertt Health Insurance 

The College's Student Health Insurance covers limited medi- 
cal and hospital expenses not included in the normal services 
of the Newton College Health Service. 

ACCIDENTS 

The plan provides reimbursement for all medical expenses up 
to $1,000 which may result from accidents, and 75% of ex- 
penses in excess of $1,000 up to $1,500. 

SICKNESS 

In case of sickness, the policy provides reimbursement for 
medical treatment up to $500, except that no benefit is pay- 
able for the first physician's visit if the student is not confined 
to a hospital. (The infirmary operated by Newton College of 
the Sacred Heart, Spellman Infirmary, is not a hospital.) For 
expenses above $500, the policy covers 75% of incurred 
medical expenses up to $2,000. 

These benefits are in addition to any benefits the student 
may receive under a personal policy or membership in a 
hospital association. As students are normally covered by 
family insurance plans, the Student Health Insurance provided 
by Newton College is designed to supplement such paid 
policies and is not intended to be a comprehensive policy. 
Coverage is on an annual basis. 

Schedule o1 Payments 



Reservation Deposit 

Early Decision Applicants 

Entering Freshmen 

Currently Enrolled Students 
Fall Semester Fees 
Spring Semester Fees 
All Other Fees 



by January 15 
by May 1 
by April 15 
by September 1 
by January 15 
Payable When Billed 

Note: All College fees are subject to change at any time at 

the discretion of the College. 



39 



Plans of Payment 



Many Newton College families have, in recent years, elected 
to meet college expenses from current income through tuition 
payment plans which are available. Three such plans are 
eridorsed by Newton College and further information may be 
obtained by writing directly to the addresses listed below. 

a) Education Funds Inc. 
Howard Building — Box 4 
Providence, Rhode Island 02903 

b) The National Shawmut Bank 
Tuition Aid Program 

542 Commonwealth Avenue 
Boston, Massachusetts 02215 

c) The Tuition Plan 

Newton College of the Sacred Heart 
Newton, Massachusetts 02159 



Refund Policy 



The tuition fee is not refundable except to a student whose 
credentials are unsatisfactory. The room and board fee may 
be refunded on a pro-rata basis. 




Board of Trustees 



Elizabeth Sweeney, R.S.C.J., B.S. 
Newton, Massachusetts 
Chairman of the Board 
Isabelle P. Buckley, B.A. 
Sherman Oaks, California 
John H. Chandler, Ph.D. 
St. Louis, Missouri 
Malin Craig, R.S.C.J., B.A. 
Newton, Massachusetts 
Louise Desaulniers, B.A. 
Boston, Massachusetts 
Margaret Dever, M.A. 
Boston, Massachusetts 
Jean Ford, R.S.C.J., M.A. 
Newton, Massachusetts 



40 



James T. Harris, Jr., M.A. 

Chicago, Illinois 

Claire Kondolf, R.S.C.J., M.A. 

Newton, Massachusetts 

T. Vincent Learson, B.A. 

Rye, New York 

Catherine E. Maguire, R. S.C.J. , Ph.D. 

Newton, Massachusetts 

Thomas H. D. Mahoney, Ph.D. 

Cambridge, Massachusetts 

Mary H. Quinlan, R.S.C.J., Ph.D. 

Newton, Massachusetts 

Loretta Santen, R. S.C.J. , M.A. 

Newton, Massachusetts 

James J. Whalen, Ph.D. 

Newton, Massachusetts 



The Advisory Board 



His Eminence, Richard Cardinal Cushing, D.D., LL.D. 

Nancy M. Bowdring, M.Ed. 

John S. Crowley, M.S. A. 

Reverend Paul A. FitzGerald, S.J., Ph.D. 

Theodore Marier, M.A. 

Philip J. McNiff, B.A., B.Sc. 

Cornelius C. Moore, LL.B. 

Richard H. Nolan, LL.B. 

Right Reverend Msgr. Timothy O'Leary, Ph.D. 

Roger L. Putnam, B.A. 

Daniel Sargent, M.A. 

Frank Sawyer 

John W. Speilman, M.D. 

Alice M. Walsh (Mrs. Robert Walsh), M.A. 

Honorable Kevin H. White 



Division and Department Chairmen 



CHARLES R. BOTTICELLI 
B.A. University of Connecticut; M.A. Williams College; 
Ph.D. Harvard University 
Director of the Division of Science 

GUILLEMINE de LACOSTE 
B.A. Newman College of the Sacred Heart; 
M.A. Georgetown University; 
Ph.D. University of Paris 
Chairman of the Department of Philosophy 



MARGARET DEVER 
B.A. Mount Saint Scholastica; M.A. Harvard University 
Coordinator of the Study of World Cultures 

PHILIPPE de LACOSTE 
Licentiate in Law, University of Paris; M.A. University of Paris; 
Ph.D. University of Paris 
Chairman of the Department of Political Science 

UBALDO DiBENEDETTO 
B.A. Northeastern University; M.Ed. Bridgewater State College; 
M.A. Middlebury College; Ph.D. University of Madrid 
Director of the Division of Modern Languages 

JOHN H. FLANNAGAN, JR. 
B.A. College of the Holy Cross; M.A. University of Detroit; 
Ph.D. candidate, Georgetown University 
Coordinator of the American Studies Program 

OFELIA GARCIA, R.S.J.C. 
Escuela Nacional de Bellas Artes, La Habana; 
B.A. Manhattanville College; M.F.A. candidate, 
Boston Museum School 
Chairman of the Department of Art 

MARGARET MARY GORMAN, R.S.C.J. 
B.A. Trinity College (Washington); M.A. Fordham University; 
Ph.D. Catholic University of America 
Chairman of the Department of Psychology 

DONALD F. KRIER 
B.S. Marquette University; M.A. Marquette University; 
Ph.D. Boston College 
Chairman of the Department of Economics 

PIERRE Y. S. LUBENEC 
Diploma, Ecole Centrale, Paris, France 
Chairman of the Department of Mathematics 

MARIE MULLIN McHUGH 
B.A. Manhattanville College of the Sacred Heart; 
M.A. Radcliffe College; Ph.D. Radcliffe College 
Chairman of the Department of History 

WILLIAM MURNION 
Ph.L. Gregorian University; S.T.L. Gregorian University; 
S.T.D. Gregorian University; 
Ph.D. candidate, Gregorian University 
Chairman of the Department of Religion 



41 



ANTHONY NEMETHY 
B.A. Academy of Law, Kecskemet; M.S. College of Agriculture, 
Vienna; Ph.D. Royal Hungarian Palatin, Joseph University of 
Technical and Economic Sciences, Budapest 
Chairman of the Department of Sociology 

MARY H. QUINLAN, R.S.C.J. 
B.A. Manhattanville College of the Sacred Heart; 
M.A. Catholic University of America; Ph.D. Catholic 
University of America 
Coordinator of the Liberal Studies Program 

HELEN R. SHERK 
B.A. State University of Iowa; M.A. State University of Iowa; 
Ph.D. Columbia University 
Acting Chairman of the Department of English 

Administration 

JAMES J. WHALEN, Ph.D. 
President; Professor of Psychology 

MARY H. QUINLAN, R.S.C.J., Ph.D. 
Academic Dean; Professor of History 

CLARE L. McGOWAN, R.S.C.J., M.A. 
Assistant Academic Dean 

JANIS I. SOMERVILLE, M.B.A. 
Assistant Academic Dean; Assistant Professor of Education 

FRANCES de LA CHAPELLE, R.S.C.J., M.A. 
Dean of Students 

MARKEY P. BURKE (MRS. THOMAS F.), B.A. 
Director of Admissions 

JOAN S. NORTON, Ed.M. 
Director of Career Counseling; Financial Aid Counselor 

FRANCES A. CONNELLY, M.Ed. 
Registrar 

NORMAN WEBSTER, M.L.S. 
Librarian 

MARGARET McDONNELL, R.S.C.J., R.N. 
Director of Student Health Services 
Chaplain 

R. JAMES HENDERSON, M.A. 
Business Manager 

CLAIRE KONDOLF, R.S.C.J., M.A. 
Director of Development and Public Relations 



CATHERINE H. LONG (MRS. THOMAS M.), B.A. 
Director of Alumnae Affairs 

MARY K. OSWALD, R.S.C.J., M.A. 
Coordinator of Events and Facilities 

Faculty 

JAMES J. WHALEN, Ph.D. 

President; Professor of Psychiology 
B.A. Franklin and Marshall College; M.S. Pennsylvania State 
University; Ph.D. Pennsylvania State University 

MARY H. QUINLAN, R.S.C.J., Ph.D. 

Academic Dean; Professor of History 
B.A. Manhattanville College; M.A. Catholic University of 
America; Ph.D. Catholic University of America. 

GRIDTH ABLON (Mrs. Steven Ablon), Ph.D. 

Lecturer in Psychology 
B.A. Smith College; Ph.D. Western Reserve University 

ROSALIE AFAN (Mrs. Peter Afan), B.A. 

Assistant Professor of German and Russian 
B.A. Teachers College of Foreign Languages, Rostov, Russia. 

MARY DAY ALBERT, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences 
B.A. University of New Hampshire; M.A. Bryn Mawr College; 
Ph.D. Brown University. 

SISTER MARY ANGELINA, Ph.D.* 
B.Sc. National University of Ireland, University College 
Galway; A.M. The Catholic University of America; Ph.D. 
The Catholic University of America. 

JANE APPLETON (Mrs. William Appleton), A.B. 

Instructor in Music 
A.B. Wheaton College. 

WILLIAM A. BEARSE, III, B.A. 

Instructor in Psycfiology 
B.A. Boston University; Candidate for Ph.D. Boston University. 

FRANK A. BELAMARICH, Ph.D. 

Lecturer in Biology 
B.A. Montclair State College; M.A. Harvard University; 
Ph.D. Harvard University. 

MARJORIE BELL, M.Ed. 

Director of Pfiysical Education 
Graduate of the Sargent School of Physical Education; 
B.S. Boston University; M.Ed. Suffolk University. 



42 



CHARLES R. BOTTICELLI, Ph.D. 

Director of Science and Professor of Biotogy 
B.A. University of Connecticut; M.A. Williams College; 
Ph.D. Harvard University. 

LILLIAN BRODERICK (Mrs. James Broderick), Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Englisti 
B.A. Newcomb College; M.A. University of North Carolina; 
Ph.D. Harvard University. 

GERALD L. BUCKE, M.A.* 
L.S.T. St. John's Seminary; M.A. Boston College 

ELIZABETH J. BUCKLEY {Mrs. Jerome H. Buckley), M.A., a^ 

Assistant Professor of Englisti 
B.A. University of Toronto; M.A. University of Wisconsin. 

PAULINE CARRARA (Mrs. Antonio Carrara), M.A. 

Instructor in Italian 
B.A. Boston University; M.A. Boston College. 

AILEEN M. COHALAN, R.S.C.J., M.Mus. 

Lecturer in l\Ausic 
B.Mus. Manhattanville College; M.Mus. Boston University; 
Colleague, American Guild of Organists. 

JOSEPH F. CONWAY, M.A. 

Associate Professor of Political Science and History 
B.A. University of Rochester; M.A. University of Rochester. 

FREDERIC COURTOIS 

Lecturer in Art 
Ecole Saint Luc; Academie des Beaux-Arts, Liege, Belgium. 

NELLY COURTOIS (Mme. Frederic Courtois) 

Assistant Professor of French 
Diploma of Ecole Centrale de Service Sociale, Brussels; 
Brevet, Alliance Frangaise, Paris; Diplome Superleur de 
Langue Moderne, Paris. 

FRANCES CUNNINGHAM, R.S.C.J., Ph.D. 

Professor of Biology 
B.A. Manhattanville College; M.S. Villanova College; Ph.D. 
Catholic University of America. 

MARY JEANNE CURRAN (Mrs. Robert J. Curran), B.S. 

Assistant to ttie Coordinator of tlie Study of World Cultures 
B.S. Newton College of the Sacred Heart. 

ROBERT J. CURRAN, M.A. 

Associate Professor of Pfiilosophy 
B.A. Fordham University; M.A. Fordham University. 

MARGARET DEVER (Mrs. Joseph Dever), Ed.M. 
Coordinator of the Study of World Cultures 
B.A. Mt. St. Scholastica; Ed.M. Harvard University. 



UBALDO DiBENEDETTO, Ph.D. 

Director of Language Programs and Professor of Italian 

and Spanish 
B.A. Northeastern University; M.Ed. Bridgewater State 
College; M.A. Middlebury College; Ph.D. University of Madrid. 

VERA ERDELY (Mrs. Alexander Erdely), M.A. 

Assistant Professor of French 
M.A. Harvard University, Candidate for Ph.D. Boston College. 

ORA D. FANT 

Instructor in Psychology 
B.A. Oberlin College; M.A. Boston College; Candidate for 
Ph.D. Boston College. 

FRANCES D. FERGUSON (Mrs. Peter J. Ferguson), M.A., a 

Assistant Professor of Art History 
B.A. Wellesley College; M.A. Harvard University; candidate 
for Ph.D. Harvard University. 

WILLIAM A. FINK, S.T.L 

Assistant Professor of Religion 
B.A. Boston College; S.T.L. Institut Catholique de Paris. 

JOHN H. FLANNAGAN, JR., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of History 
B.A. Holy Cross; M.A. Detroit University; candidate for Ph.D. 
Georgetow/n University. 

GERARD FORD, A.M.* 
B.S. Boston College; A.M. Boston College. 

OFELIA GARCIA, R.S.C.J., B.A. 

Instructor in Art 
Escuela Nacionale de Bellas Artes, La Habana; B.A. 
Manhattanville College; Candidate for M.F.A. Boston Museum 
School. 

PATRICIA GEOGHEGAN, R.S.C.J., M.F.A. 

Instructor in Art 
B.F.A. Newcomb College, Tulane University; M.F.A. Tufts 
University. 

FRANQOISE GIANOUTSOS (Mrs. Theodore Gianoutsos), 

M.A. 

Assistant Professor of French 
Baccalaureat Lycee de Deauville; Certificat D'Etudes 
Litteraires Generales, University of Caen; M.A. Boston College. 

LUBOMIR GLEIMAN, Ph.D. 

Professor of Political Science 
B.A. Thomas More Institute, Montreal; M.A. Institute of 
Medieval Studies, University of Montreal; Ph.D. Institute of 



43 



Medieval Studies, University of Montreal; graduate study at 
the University of Bratislava, Solvakia, University of Municfi, 
Germany, and University of Innsbruck, Austria. 

MARGARET MARY GORMAN, R.S.C.J., Ph.D. 

Professor of Psychotogy 
B.A. Trinity College (Washington); M.A. Fordham University; 
Ph.D. Catholic University of America. 

A. NICHOLAS GROTH, A.M. 

Instructor in Psycfiology 
A.B. Boston University; A.M. Boston University; Candidate 
for Ph.D. Boston University. 

EDWARD F. HANLON, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of History and American Studies 
A.B. King's College, Wilkes Barre, Penna.; Ph.D. Georgetow/n 
University. 

NATALIE ALLON HARRIS (Mrs. Richard Harris), M.A. 

Instructor in Sociology 
B.A. Wellesley College; M.A. Boston University; Candidate for 
Ph.D. Brandeis University. 

ALICE HUSSON, R.S.C.J., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of French and Education 
B.A. Manhattanville College; M.A. Boston College; Ph.D. 
Boston College. 

MAUREEN A. JOY, Ed.M. 

Coordinator of Education Program and 

Assistant Professor in Education 
B.A. Manhattanville College; M.A. Manhattanville College; 
Ed.M. Harvard University; Candidate Ed.D. Harvard University. 

ROBERT T. JUNGELS, M.A. 

Lecturer in Art 
B.A. University of Notre Dame; M.A. State University of Iowa. 

L. EDWARD KAMOSKI, Ph.D. 

Professor of Pfiilosophy 
B.A. and M.A. Tufts University; Ph.D. Cornell University. 

JANA M. KIELY (Mrs. Robert J. Kiely), M.A. 

Lecturer in Biology 
Licence de Sciences Naturelles, Sorbonne; M.A. Radcliffe 
College; Candidate for Ph.D. Radcliffe College. 

ELIZABETH KOVALTCHOUK-KEAN (Mrs. Basil Kean), B.A. 

Associate Professor of Russian 
Kiev Bymnazia, Russia; Certificat d'Etudes, Cairo, Egypt; 
B.A. St. Vincent of Paul's College, Egypt. 



44 



DONALD F. KRIER, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Economics 
B.S. Marquette University; M.A. Marquette University; 
Ph.D. Boston College. 

GUILLEMINE de LACOSTE (Mme. Philippe de Lacoste), 

Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Phiilosophiy 
B.A. Newton College of the Sacred Heart; M.A. Georgetown 
University; Ph.D. University of Paris. 

PHILIPPE de LACOSTE, Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Political Science 
Licentiate in Law, University of Paris; M.A. University of Paris; 
Ph.D. University of Paris. 

PHILIP LADER, A.M., ai 

Instructor in Political Science 
A.B. Duke University; A.M. University of Michigan; Candidate 
for J.D. Harvard University. 

CHARLES K. LEVY, Ph.D. 

Lecturer in Biology 
B.S. George Washington University; M.S. George Washington 
University; Ph.D. University of North Carolina. 

DORIS LEWIS (Mrs. Frederick P. Lewis), Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 
B.S. Duke University; Ph.D. Tufts University. 

ELEANOR B. LINEHAN, Ed.D. 

Lecturer in Education 
B.S. Boston University; M.S. Boston University; Ed.D. Boston 
University. 

ELAINE BIGANESS LIVINGSTONE (Mrs. Melvin Livingstone), 

B.F.A. 

Assistant Professor of Art 
B.F.A. Massachusetts College of Art; Associate Scholar, 
Radcliffe Institute for Independent Study. 

PIERRE Y. S. LUBENEC 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 
Diploma, Ecoie Centrale de Paris, Paris, France. 

CATHERINE E. MAGUIRE, R.S.C.J., Ph.D. 

Professor of English 
B.A. College of Mount Saint Vincent; M.A. Columbia 
University; Ph.D. Fordham University. 

FRANK D. MAGUIRE, M.A. 

Associate Professor of Religion 
B.S. Loyola College (Montreal); B.A. St. Michael's College 
(Toronto); M.A. Institute of Medieval Studies, University of 



Montreal; graduate study at Oxford, University of Paris 
(Sorbonne), University of Munich; Candidate for Ph.D. 
Institute of Medieval Studies, University of Montreal. 

PHILIP MARCUS, M.A. 

Associate Professor of Art 
Graduate of the Museum of Fine Arts School; B.F.A. Tufts 
University; M.A. Harvard University. 

MARY A. McCAY (Mrs. Douglas McCay), M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Englisti 
B.A. Catholic University of America; M.A. Boston College; 
Candidate for Ph.D. Tufts University 

JAMES W. McCLAIN, B.A. 

Instructor in History 
B.A. Providence College; Graduate Study at Boston College 
School of Social Work. 

MARIE MULLIN McHUGH (Mrs. Edward J. McHugh), Ph.D. 

Professor of History 
B.A. Manhattanville College; M.A. Radcliffe College; 
Ph.D. Radcliffe College. 

FAINE McMULLEN, R.S.C.J., M.A., J.D. 

Assistant Professor in Political Science 
B.A. College of Mount Saint Vincent; J.D. Fordham University; 
M.A. Manhattanville College; graduate study at the Catholic 
University of America. 

WILLIAM E. MURNION, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Religion 
Ph.L. Gregorian University; S.T.L. Gregorian University; 
Ph.D. Gregorian University; Candidate for S.T.D. Gregorian 
University. 

NAOMI SUCONICK MYRVAAGNES (Mrs. Eric Myrvaagnes), 

Ph.D. 

Lecturer in English 
B.A. University of Pennsylvania; M.A. University of Illinois; 
Ph.D. New York University. 

RENEE G. NAVES, Ph.D. 
Professor of Chemistry 
M.S. University of Geneva; Ph.D. University of Geneva. 

ANTHONY NEMETHY, Ph.D. 

Professor of Sociology and Economics 
B.A. Academy of Law, Kecskemet; M.S. College of Agriculture, 
Vienna; Ph.D. Royal Hungarian Palatin, Joseph University of 
Technical and Economic Sciences, Budapest. 

JOHN S. OLIVER, M.Mus. 

Assistant Professor of f^usic 
B.Mus. University of Notre Dame du Lac; M.Mus. New England 
Conservatory of Music. 



HERBERT F. OSTRACH, M.A. 
Instructor in Art 
B.A. Brown University; M.A. Brown University. 

LEO J. PARENTE, Ph.D. 

Lecturer in Economics 
B.S. Boston College; M.A. Tufts University; Ph.D. University of 
Connecticut. 

GERALD S. PIERCE, B.D. 

Assistant Professor in Religion 
B.A. Boston College; B.D. Harvard Divinity School; study at 
Institut Catholique de Paris; Candidate for Ph.D. Harvard 
University. 

KENNETH J. PRESKENIS, M.A. 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 
B.A. Boston College; M.A. Brown University; Candidate for 
Ph.D. Brown University. 

CAROL PUTNAM, R.S.C.J., Ph.D. 

Professor of Art 
B.A. Manhattanville College; M.F.A. Catholic University of 
America; M.A. Catholic University of America; Ph.D. Catholic 
University of America. 

ROBERT G. ROGERS, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Religion 
B.S. Ohio State University; S.T.B. Boston University School of 
Theology; Ph.D. Boston University; graduate study at the 
University of London Institute of Archaeology and at the 
School of Oriental and African Studies. 

NIKITA ROODKOWSKY, M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Russian History and Language 
B.A. Columbia University; M.A. Columbia University. 

GORDON SAINSBURY a 

Lecturer in Art 
The Architectural Association, London. 

MARIA AMPARO SAN JUAN, M.A. 
Assistant Professor of Spanish 
B.A. University of Salamanca; M.A. University of Valladolid. 

LORETTA SANTEN, R.S.C.J., M.A., a 

Associate Professor of Religion 
B.A. Manhattanville College; B.S. Library Science, Columbia 
University; M.A. Catholic University of America; M.A. R.Ed. 
Providence College. 

RUTH M. SCHICKEL, R.S.C.J., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 
B.A. Manhattanville College; M.A. Catholic University of 
America; graduate study at Stanford University. 



45 



ALBERT C. SCHNEIDER, JR., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Sociology 
B.A. Harvard College; M.A. Harvard University; Candidate for 
Ph.D. Harvard University. 

HELEN R. SHERK (Mrs. Donald R. Sherk), Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of English 
B.A. State University of Iowa; M.A. State University of Iowa; 
Ph.D. Columbia University. 

VINCENT J. SOLOMITA, B.Arch. 

Assistant Professor of Art 
B.Arch. Pratt Institute; study at American Art School of 
Fontainebleau, France; Ecole des Beaux Arts, Paris. 

JANIS I. SOMERVILLE, M.B.A. 

Assistant Professor of Education 
B.A. Pennsylvania State University; M.B.A. Harvard University 
School of Business Administration. 

JOHN M. STECZYNSKI, M.F.A. 

Assistant Professor of Art 
B.F.A. University of Notre Dame; M.F.A. Yale University 
School of Design. 

ELLEN A. TAXER, Ph.D. 

Professor of German 
M.S. University of Vienna; Ph.D. University of Vienna. 

JAMES F. TAYLOR, Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Classics 
B.A. Haverford College; A.M. Harvard University; Ph.D. 
Harvard University. 

GUADALUPE TORRES, R.S.C.J., Ph.D. 

Professor of Spanisfi 
B.A. San Francisco College for Women; M.A. Stanford 
University; Ph.D. Stanford University. 

ADOLF L. VANDENDORPE, Ph.D. 

Instructor in Economics 
B.A. University of Louvain, Belgium; Ph.D. Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology. 

DOROTHY W. WEEKS, Ph.D. 

Lecturer in Physics 
B.A. Wellesley College; M.S., Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology. 



ELIZABETH S. WHITE, R.S.C.J., Ph.D., a 

Professor of English 
B.A. Manhattanville College; M.A. Radcliffe College; Ph.D. 
Catholic University of America. 

BOLESLAW A. WYSOCKI, Ph.D. 

Professor of Psychology 
Certificate in Business Administration University of Cracow; 
Diploma in Psychology and Statistics University of Edinburgh; 
Certificate University of Cambridge; M.A. University of Cracow; 
Ph.D. University of London. 

a absent on leave 

a' absent on leave first semester 

a2 absent on leave second semester 

* In the Mt. Alvernia College Program. 

Alumnae Association of Newton College of the Sacred Heart 

Officers of the Alumnae Association 

President 
Miss Nancy M. Bowdring 
4 Warner Street 
West Somerville, Massachusetts 02144 

Vice-President 
Mrs. Denis J. Riley 
25 Otis Street 
Norwich, Connecticut 06360 

Secretary 
Mrs. Bernard J. Dwyer 
511 Veterans of Foreign Wars Parkway 
Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 02167 

Treasurer 
Miss Patricia Leary 
15 Woodsum Drive 
Braintree, Massachusetts 02184 

Chapter Presidents 
The Boston Club 
Mrs. Edward J. O'Neil, III 
25 Morse Road 
Newtonville, Massachusetts 02160 



46 



The Chicago Club 
Miss Ruth Craddock 
Apartment 509 
1255 Sandburg Terrace 
Chicago, Illinois 60610 

The Cleveland Club 
Mrs. Joseph A. Rotolo 
3674 Townley Road 
Shaker Heights, Ohio 44122 

The Connecticut River Valley Club 
Mrs. John B. Burke, Jr. 
94 Plymouth Lane 
Manchester, Connecticut 06040 

The Detroit Club 
Mrs. Peter J. Mercier 
1075 Parker Avenue 
Detroit, Michigan 48214 

The New York Club 
Miss Sheila Mahony 
Apartment 7G 
220 East 67th Street 
New York, New York 10021 

The Philadelphia Club 
Mrs. Richard P. Cancelmo 
735 County Line Road 
Villanova, Pennsylvania 19087 

The Rhode Island Club 
Mrs. Edward G. Hicks 
Louise F. Luther Drive 
Cumberland, Rhode Island 02864 

The Washington, D.C. Club 
Miss Maureen Harnisch 
668 Maryland Interstate 
Maryland Avenue, N.E. 
Washington, D.C. 20002 



Gifts and Bequests 



Newton College of the Sacred Heart is one of the youngest members of the 
group of schools which have made New England an educational center of 
the country. Its needs are many. Therefore, its Trustees will welcome gifts, 
bequests, or awards which may be dedicated to general educational needs, 
or to the endowment of professorships, scholarships or fellowships in 
accordance with the wishes of the donor. Such funds could constitute 
memorials to the donor or to any person whom he may name. 

Donors may seek their own legal counsel or make bequests in the 
following form: 

I give and bequest to Newton College of the Sacred Heart, Inc., an 
educational corporation established by special charter in Newton, State of 

Massachusetts, the sum of dollars, to be 

appropriated by the Trustees of the College for its benefit. 



47 



Index 



Academic Calendar / IBC 
Academic Policies / 3 
Accidents / 39 
Administration / 42 
Advisory Board / 41 
Alumnae Association / 46 
American Studies Program / 6 
Application Fee / 39 
Art/ 6 
Art History / 6 

Bachelor of Arts / 2 
Bachelor of Science / 2 
Bequests / 47 
Biology / 33 
Board of Trustees / 40 

Change of Schedule / 3 
Chemistry / 34 
Classics Program / 9 
Comparative Literature Program / 10 
Course Load / 5 
Courses of Instruction / 6 
Credit for Other Work / 4 
Cross-Registration / 4 
Curriculum / 2 

Degree Requirements / 2 
Division and 

Department Chairmen / 41 

Economics / 10 
Education / 11 



Education Program / 3 

English / 12 

Extra Registration Fee / 38 

Faculty / 42 

Fees / 39 

Fees and Expenses / 38 

French / 18 

German / 20 

Gifts and Bequests / 47 

Grading System / 4 

Health Insurance / 39 
History/ 13 
Honors / 4 

Incomplete Grades / 4 
Independent Study and Reading / 4 
Interdisciplinary Courses / 15 
Interdisciplinary Majors / 3 
Italian / 20 

LaFosse Program / 5 

Late Fees / 39 

Liberal Studies Program / 15 

Majors / 3 

Mathematics / 16 

Modern Languages / 17 

Mount Alvernia College Program / 5 

Music / 22 

Music Program / 3 



Non-Major Fields / 3 

Parking Permit Fees / 39 
Pass/Fail Courses / 5 
Payment Plans / 40 
Payment Schedule / 39 
Philosophy / 22 
Physics / 35 
Political Science / 25 
Pre-Dental Studies / 36 
Pre-Medical Studies / 36 
Psychology / 27 

Readmission / 5 
Refund Policy / 40 
Registration / 5 
Registry / 40 
Religion / 28 
Reservation Deposit / 39 
Room and Board / 38 
Russian / 20 

Science / 33 

Science Education / 11, 36 

Sickness / 39 

Sociology / 36 

Spanish / 21 

Studio Art / 8 

Study Abroad / 5 

Tuition / 38 

Tuition — Part-Time / 39 

Withdrawals / 5 



48 



1970-71 Academic Calendar 



Saturday, September 5 

Sunday, September 6 

Wednesday, September 9 

Thursday, September 10 

Monday, October 12 

Wednesday, November 11 

Wednesday, November 25 

through 
Sunday, November 29 

Wednesday, December 23 

through 
Sunday, January 31 



FIRST TERM 
First Term Registration Day for Juniors 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. 
Beginning of Orientation Week for Freshmen 

First Term Registration Day for Seniors and Sophomores 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 
Beginning of First Term Classes 
Columbus Day (Holiday) 
Veterans' Day (Holiday) 

Thanksgiving Vacation 
Winter Recess 



Monday, February 1 

Monday, February 15 

Thursday, April 8 

through 
Sunday, April 18 

Tuesday, May 25 

Sunday, May 30 



SECOND TERM 
Beginning of Second Term Classes 
Observance of Washington's Birthday (Holiday) 

Spring Vacation 
Last Day of Term 
Commencement Day 



Newton College of the Sacred Heart 

Newton, Massachusetts 02159